American movie stars died in 1992

Here are 50 famous actors from United States of America died in 1992:

Isaac Asimov

Isaac Asimov (January 2, 1920 Petrovichi-April 6, 1992 Brooklyn) otherwise known as Paul French, Dr. "A", George E. Dale, H. B. Ogden, Asimov, isaac_asimov, The Human Typewriter, Isaak Judah Ozimov, Asimov, Isaac or Isaak Yudovich Ozimov was an American author, writer, science writer, novelist, biochemist, historian, essayist and actor. He had two children, David Asimov and Robyn Asimov.

Asimov is best known for his works of science fiction and popular science. He wrote or edited over 500 books and an estimated 90,000 letters and postcards, making him one of the most prolific writers of all time. Some of his most popular works include the Foundation and Robot series, as well as books such as "I, Robot" and "The Caves of Steel". As a biochemist, he made significant contributions to the understanding of the human body's biochemistry and was a professor of biochemistry at Boston University. As an essayist, he wrote on a wide range of topics, including science, history, literature, and religion. Asimov received numerous awards and honors for his contributions to literature, science, and education, including the Hugo, Nebula, and Bram Stoker awards.

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John Cage

John Cage (September 5, 1912 Los Angeles-August 12, 1992 Manhattan) also known as John Milton Cage or John Milton Cage Jr. was an American philosopher, composer, author, visual artist, actor, musician and film score composer.

Cage was a pioneer in experimental music, particularly in the development of indeterminate music, electroacoustic music, and non-standard use of musical instruments. He is best known for his seminal work, 4'33", which is a composition that consists of silence and is meant for any instrument or combination of instruments. Cage's work has had a profound influence on modern music and art, and he is revered as one of the most important figures in 20th-century experimental art. He has received numerous awards and honors for his contributions to the arts, including the National Medal of Arts and the Kyoto Prize in Arts and Philosophy. Cage was also a leading figure in the Fluxus movement and was known for his collaborations with Merce Cunningham, a choreographer with whom he had a lifelong creative partnership.

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Bert Parks

Bert Parks (December 30, 1914 Atlanta-February 2, 1992 La Jolla) also known as Bert Jacobson was an American singer and actor.

He is best known as the longtime host of the Miss America beauty pageant from 1955 to 1979. Parks was also a popular television personality and hosted several other game shows and variety programs throughout his career, including "Break the Bank" and "Masquerade Party." In addition to his television work, he appeared in several movies and stage productions. Parks continued to perform well into his later years and was inducted into the Broadcasting and Cable Hall of Fame in 1992, shortly before his death.

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Chuck Connors

Chuck Connors (April 10, 1921 Brooklyn-November 10, 1992 Los Angeles) also known as Kevin Joseph Aloysius Connors, Chuck Conners, Kevin Joseph Connors, Kevin Joseph "Chuck" Connors or Chuck was an American athlete, actor, screenwriter, basketball player and baseball player. His children are called Mike Connors, Jeff Connors, Steve Connors and Kevin Connors.

Chuck Connors was best known for his role as the title character in the western TV series "The Rifleman". Before he became an actor, he had a successful career in sports, playing professional basketball for the Boston Celtics and baseball for the Brooklyn Dodgers and the Chicago Cubs. He also served in the army during World War II. In addition to his work in Hollywood, Connors also wrote screenplays and worked as a producer. He passed away at the age of 71 from pneumonia stemming from lung cancer.

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Roger Miller

Roger Miller (January 2, 1936 Fort Worth-October 25, 1992 Los Angeles) also known as Roger Dean Miller, Roger Millier, Roger Dean Miller, Sr. or The Wild Child was an American singer-songwriter, composer, lyricist, actor and musician. His children are called Michael Miller, Alan Miller, Shari Miller, Rhonda Miller, Dean Miller, Shannon Miller, Taylor Miller and Adam Miller.

Miller emerged on the country music scene in the mid-1960s and became famous for hits such as "King of the Road," "Dang Me," and "Chug-a-Lug." He won eleven Grammy Awards and was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1995. Miller was also a talented actor, appearing in films such as "What a Way to Go!" and "Robin and the 7 Hoods." In addition to his solo work, Miller wrote and produced music for other artists, including hits for Willie Nelson and George Jones. Despite his success, Miller struggled with addiction and died of lung cancer at the age of 56. He remains a beloved figure in country music and his songs continue to be covered by artists across the genre.

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Roy Acuff

Roy Acuff (September 15, 1903 Maynardville-November 23, 1992 Nashville) also known as Roy Claxton Acuff, Acuff, Roy or King of Country Music was an American singer, singer-songwriter, fiddler, promoter, businessperson, baseball player and actor.

He was born in Maynardville, Tennessee and began his music career performing in medicine shows and on radio stations in the 1930s. Acuff's band, the Smoky Mountain Boys, became famous for their honky-tonk and country music, and he signed his first recording contract in 1936 with Vocalion Records. Throughout the 1940s and 1950s, Acuff continued to produce hits, including "Wabash Cannonball" and "The Great Speckled Bird."

In addition to his music career, Acuff was also a savvy businessman who founded Acuff-Rose Music, one of the most successful music publishing companies of its time. He was also a co-founder of the Country Music Association and the first president of the Grand Ole Opry.

Acuff was inducted into the Country Music Hall of Fame in 1962 and received numerous awards throughout his career, including the National Medal of Arts in 1991. Despite suffering a stroke in 1992, Acuff continued to perform until his death later that year.

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Dana Andrews

Dana Andrews (January 1, 1909 Covington County-December 17, 1992 Los Alamitos) also known as Carver Dana Andrews was an American actor. He had four children, Stephen Andrews, David Andrews, Susan Andrews and Katharine Andrews.

Andrews started his career on stage before transitioning to film in the 1940s. He starred in several classic films, including "Laura" (1944), "The Best Years of Our Lives" (1946), and "A Walk in the Sun" (1945). Andrews was known for his handsome leading man looks and his ability to perform in a wide range of roles. He often played tough, brooding characters, but could also display a sensitive side.

Later in his career, Andrews made the transition to television, appearing in popular shows like "Perry Mason" and "Ironside." In addition to his acting career, Andrews was also an advocate for mental health awareness and treatment. He spoke candidly about his own struggles with depression and alcoholism, and lent his voice to several educational films on the subject.

Despite his success as an actor, Andrews was known for his humble nature and strong work ethic. He passed away in 1992 at the age of 83.

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Andy Samuel

Andy Samuel (April 10, 1909 Los Angeles-March 5, 1992 Colton) a.k.a. Andrew Samuel was an American actor.

He began his career in the entertainment industry as a child performer in vaudeville shows. Samuel later transitioned to film and made his screen debut in the 1933 crime drama film "The Devil's Mate". He went on to act in over 150 films throughout his career, often in small but memorable roles. Some of his notable performances include "The Grapes of Wrath" (1940), "Sands of Iwo Jima" (1949), and "Sunset Boulevard" (1950). In addition to acting, Samuel was also a writer and director, particularly in the television industry. He was married to actress Anne Jeffreys from 1951 until his death in 1992.

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Alfred Drake

Alfred Drake (October 7, 1914 The Bronx-July 25, 1992 New York City) also known as Alfred Capurro was an American actor and singer. He had two children, Candace Olmsted and Samantha Drake.

Drake began his acting career in the 1930s, performing in various Broadway productions. He gained widespread recognition for his role as Curly in the original Broadway production of "Oklahoma!" in 1943, which earned him a Tony Award. Drake went on to star in many other successful productions, including "Kiss Me, Kate" and "The King and I."

Aside from his work on stage, Drake also appeared in several films and television shows, including "Tars and Spars" and "The Jackie Gleason Show." He also lent his voice to several animated films and television shows, including "Peter Pan" and "The Alvin Show."

Drake continued to perform on stage until the 1980s, and he remained active in the theater community until his death in 1992 at the age of 77. He is remembered as one of the greatest performers in Broadway history.

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Frederick O'Neal

Frederick O'Neal (August 27, 1905 Brooksville-August 25, 1992 New York City) otherwise known as The Memphis Naturals or Fred O'Neal was an American actor, theatrical producer and television director.

O'Neal began his career as a stage actor and producer in the 1920s, eventually founding his own theater company in the 1940s. He acted in numerous plays and musicals, including several productions of the landmark play "The Emperor Jones" by Eugene O'Neill. O'Neal also appeared in a number of films throughout his career, including "Cotton Comes to Harlem" and "Car Wash."

In addition to his work on stage and screen, O'Neal was also a leader in the entertainment industry. He served as the president of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists and was a founding member of the Negro Actors Guild of America.

Later in life, O'Neal turned to directing for television, working on a number of popular shows such as "The Cosby Show" and "A Different World." He was also a vocal advocate for civil rights and served as a mentor to many young actors and performers.

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Hal Roach

Hal Roach (January 14, 1892 Elmira-November 2, 1992 Bel-Air) also known as Harry Eugene Roach, Al Roach, Hal E. Roach, Harold Eugene "Hal" Roach Sr., Harold Eugene Roach, Sr., Hal E. Roach Sr. or Harold Eugene "Hal" Roach, Sr. was an American film producer, screenwriter, film director, television producer, actor and presenter. He had six children, Hal Roach, Jr., Margaret Roach, Kathleen Bridget Roach, Elizabeth Carson Roach, Jeanne Alice Roach and Maria May Roach.

Hal Roach was best known for producing many popular comedy films during the 1920s and 1930s, including the iconic duo of Laurel and Hardy films. He also launched the careers of several other famous comedians, such as Harold Lloyd and Our Gang (also known as The Little Rascals). Throughout his career, he produced over 1,000 films and won multiple awards, including an Honorary Academy Award for his contributions to the film industry. In addition to his work in film, Roach was also a pioneer in television programming, producing several successful series such as The Stu Erwin Show and The Gale Storm Show. He remained active in the industry until his death at the age of 100, leaving behind a legacy as one of Hollywood's most influential and successful producers.

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Romeo Muller

Romeo Muller (August 7, 1928 The Bronx-December 30, 1992 High Falls) also known as Romeo Muller, Jr., Muller or Romeo Earl Muller, Jr was an American actor, screenwriter and television producer.

He is best known for his work as a writer for several popular television specials including "Rudolph the Red-Nosed Reindeer", "Frosty the Snowman" and "The Little Drummer Boy". Muller began his career as an actor in the 1950s and soon transitioned into writing and producing. He worked on various television shows throughout his career including "The Alvin Show" and "The Flintstones". Muller was a prolific writer, creating not only television specials but also children's books and plays. He was nominated for multiple Emmy Awards throughout his career and his work remains beloved by audiences today. Romeo Muller passed away in 1992 at the age of 64.

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Allan Jones

Allan Jones (October 14, 1907 Old Forge-June 27, 1992 New York City) also known as Theodore Allen Jones was an American actor and singer. His child is called Jack Jones.

Allan Jones began his career as a singer with various bands in the 1930s before transitioning to the silver screen. He starred in numerous films throughout the 1930s and 1940s, including "Show Boat" (1936), "A Night at the Opera" (1935), and "The Marx Brothers Go West" (1940). Jones was also known for his roles in Broadway productions, such as "I Married an Angel" and "The Pajama Game."

In addition to his successful acting career, Jones was a talented tenor and recorded several hit songs throughout his lifetime, including "The Donkey Serenade" and "The Jones Boy," which was written by his son Jack Jones. Jones continued to perform and make guest appearances on television shows well into the 1980s. He passed away in 1992 at the age of 84 in New York City.

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Irving Allen Lee

Irving Allen Lee (November 21, 1948-September 5, 1992) otherwise known as Los Cuatro Vagabundos or Senor Lee was an American actor.

He was born in Brooklyn, New York and began his acting career in the 1970s. Lee was known for his roles in films such as "The Warriors" and "The Wanderers." He also appeared in television shows such as "Miami Vice" and "Law & Order." In addition to acting, Lee was a trained dancer and choreographer. He passed away in 1992 at the age of 43.

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Lyle Alzado

Lyle Alzado (April 3, 1949 Brooklyn-May 14, 1992 Portland) also known as Lyle Martin Alzado or Three Mile Lyle was an American american football player and actor.

Alzado played football at Yankton College and later at Kilgore Junior College before transferring to Texas A&M University. He was drafted by the Denver Broncos in the fourth round of the 1971 NFL Draft and spent five seasons with the team, earning two Pro Bowl selections. He later played for the Cleveland Browns and the Los Angeles Raiders.

Alzado was a controversial figure and was known for his aggressive playing style and his use of performance-enhancing drugs. He became an advocate for steroid awareness after being diagnosed with brain cancer in 1991, which he believed was caused by his use of the drugs.

In addition to football, Alzado appeared in several films including Ernest Goes to Camp and Destroyer, as well as the television series Miami Vice. He also made an appearance on The A-Team. Alzado passed away in 1992 at the age of 43 due to complications from brain cancer.

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Sterling Holloway

Sterling Holloway (January 4, 1905 Cedartown-November 22, 1992 Los Angeles) a.k.a. Sterling Price Holloway Jr., Sterling Halloway, Holloway or Sterling Price Holloway, Jr. was an American actor and voice actor. His child is called Richard Holloway.

Holloway began his acting career in the 1920s, appearing in numerous silent films. He later transitioned into voice acting, lending his voice to some of the most iconic animated characters in history, including Winnie the Pooh, the Cheshire Cat in Alice in Wonderland, and Kaa in The Jungle Book. In addition to his voice work, Holloway also had a successful career in television, appearing in shows such as The Life of Riley and The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet. Despite his prolific career, Holloway was known for his humility and kind spirit. Outside of his career, Holloway was an accomplished amateur photographer and often captured images of his fellow actors on set.

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Vincent Gardenia

Vincent Gardenia (January 7, 1920 Ercolano-December 9, 1992 Philadelphia) also known as Vincenzo Scognamiglio, Vince Gardenia, King of Brooklyn or Vincenzo Gardenia Scognamiglio was an American actor.

He was born in Italy and immigrated to the United States with his family at a young age. Gardenia began his acting career in the 1950s, performing in plays on and off Broadway. He made his film debut in 1960 in the movie "Mad Dog Coll" but gained wider recognition for his role in "Bang the Drum Slowly" (1973).

Throughout his career, Gardenia appeared in over 70 movies and television shows. He received Academy Award nominations for Best Supporting Actor for his performances in "Bang the Drum Slowly" and "Moonstruck" (1987), in which he played the father of Cher's character.

In addition to acting, Gardenia also had a passion for music and was an accomplished jazz trumpet player. He passed away in 1992 due to a heart attack while filming the movie "The Cemetery Club".

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Chuck Menville

Chuck Menville (April 17, 1940 Baton Rouge-June 15, 1992 Malibu) otherwise known as Charles David Menville, Charles Menville, Charles David "Chuck" Menville or Chuck was an American animator, screenwriter, film producer, television producer, film director and actor. His children are called Scott Menville and Chad Menville.

During his career, Chuck Menville worked on a number of notable TV shows and films, including The Pink Panther Show, The Bugs Bunny Show, The Smurfs, and The Jetsons. He co-created the popular TV series, The Snorks, and wrote for a number of other animated shows such as Pink Panther and Sons, and This is America, Charlie Brown. Chuck Menville was also an accomplished voice actor and provided the voice for characters in many of the shows he worked on.

After his sudden death in 1992, Chuck Menville was recognized as a pioneer in the animation industry and was posthumously inducted into the Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Hall of Fame. Today, his legacy continues to inspire and influence present-day animators and filmmakers.

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Ralph Strait

Ralph Strait (July 8, 1936 New Jersey-July 31, 1992 New York City) was an American actor.

He is best known for his work in the theatre, appearing in numerous productions on and off-Broadway. Strait got his start as an actor in the early 1960s, earning critical acclaim for his performance in the play "The Connection" in 1962. He went on to appear in many other theatrical productions, including "A Taste of Honey" and "The Boys in the Band."

In addition to his stage work, Strait also appeared in several films and television shows. He had a small role in the classic 1967 film "The Graduate" and also appeared in the TV series "Kojak" and "The Streets of San Francisco."

Throughout his career, Strait was recognized for his talent and dedication to the craft of acting. He received several awards and nominations for his work, including a Drama Desk Award for his performance in the play "Molly" in 1973.

Tragically, Strait passed away in 1992 at the age of 56 due to complications from HIV/AIDS. He is remembered as a talented actor and a trailblazer for openly gay performers in the entertainment industry.

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Chuck Mitchell

Chuck Mitchell (November 28, 1927 Connecticut-June 22, 1992 Hollywood) also known as Chuck 'Porky' Mitchell was an American actor, singer and stand-up comedian.

He began his career as a stand-up comedian and later transitioned to acting, appearing in films and television shows such as "American Graffiti," "The Brady Bunch," and "The Love Boat." Mitchell was also a singer, releasing several albums in the 1970s. He was married to fellow actress and comedian, Elaine Giftos. Mitchell passed away in 1992 at the age of 64 from cancer.

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Bill Williams

Bill Williams (May 15, 1915 Brooklyn-September 21, 1992 Burbank) a.k.a. Hermann Katt, Bill MacWilliams, Herman August Wilhelm Katt, Willie or William H. Katt was an American actor and vaudeville performer. He had three children, William Katt, Jody Katt and Juanita Katt.

Bill Williams began his career in vaudeville in the late 1920s before transitioning to film in the 1940s. He starred in several films, including "The Blue Eagle" (1926) and "The Stratton Story" (1949). He also appeared in a number of popular TV shows, such as "The Lone Ranger" and "Zorro". In addition to his acting career, Williams was a talented horseman and worked for several years as a rodeo cowboy.

Williams was married twice, first to Barbara Hale from 1946 to 1981 and later to Marianna Hill from 1982 until his death in 1992. His son, William Katt, followed in his father's footsteps and became an actor, best known for his role in the TV show "The Greatest American Hero". Bill Williams was also a licensed pilot and owned his own plane.

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Ralph Camargo

Ralph Camargo (February 27, 1912 California-January 15, 1992 Greenwich) also known as Rafael Jaime Camargo was an American actor. His children are called Victoria Wyndham and Felice Camargo.

Born to a Spanish father and a Mexican mother, Ralph Camargo began his career in entertainment as a musician, playing trumpet in various jazz bands throughout the 1930s. He later transitioned to acting, appearing on stage and screen in numerous productions throughout the 1940s and 1950s. Camargo is perhaps best known for his portrayal of the character Carlos Rodriguez in the soap opera "Another World," a role he played for over a decade. He was also a founding member of the original Actors Studio, alongside Marlon Brando and Montgomery Clift. In addition to his acting work, Camargo was an accomplished artist and sculptor.

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Morris Carnovsky

Morris Carnovsky (September 5, 1897 St. Louis-September 1, 1992 Easton) was an American actor. He had one child, Stephen Carnovsky.

Morris Carnovsky was a renowned stage actor who began his career in the 1920s, appearing in numerous productions on Broadway. He was known for his powerful performances in Shakespearean plays, especially in the roles of Shylock and King Lear. In addition to his stage work, Carnovsky also acted in several films, including "Dead Reckoning" and "Johnny Angel." He was a victim of the McCarthy era blacklist, which led to his departure from Hollywood, but he continued to act on stage and television. In 1963, he was nominated for a Tony Award for his work in the play "Tovarich." Carnovsky was also a founding member of the Actor's Studio in New York City. He passed away in Easton, Connecticut at the age of 94.

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Dick York

Dick York (September 4, 1928 Fort Wayne-February 20, 1992 East Grand Rapids) also known as Richard Allen York or Richard York was an American actor. His children are called Kim York, Mandy York, Stacy York, Christopher York and Matthew York.

Dick York was best known for his role as the original Darren Stephens in the popular television series "Bewitched" from 1964-1969. Prior to his role in "Bewitched," York appeared in numerous films, including "They Came to Cordura" (1959) and "Inherit the Wind" (1960). After leaving the show due to health issues, York continued to act in films and television, notably appearing in "The Twilight Zone" and "Fantasy Island." York also worked as a voice actor for animated series and commercials. In addition to his acting career, York was a dedicated activist, speaking out about civil rights and environmental issues.

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Neville Brand

Neville Brand (August 13, 1920 Griswold-April 16, 1992 Sacramento) was an American actor. He had three children, Mary Raymer Brand, Katrina Brand and Michelle Beuttel Brand.

Brand had a prolific acting career and appeared in over 100 films and TV shows. He served in World War II and was awarded both the Purple Heart and Silver Star for his service. Brand's notable film roles include "Stalag 17," "The Naked and the Dead," and "Birdman of Alcatraz." He also appeared in popular TV shows such as "Laredo," "Rawhide," and "The Twilight Zone." In addition to acting, Brand was a skilled athlete and was a champion wrestler in college. He passed away at the age of 71 due to emphysema in Sacramento, California.

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Steve Brodie

Steve Brodie (November 21, 1919 El Dorado-January 9, 1992 West Hills) also known as John Stevenson, John Stevens, Steve Brody, Steve Broide, John Stephens or Steve Brode was an American actor. He had one child, Kevin Brodie.

Steve Brodie began his acting career in the 1940s, appearing in bit roles in numerous films. His breakthrough role came in the 1951 film "The Steel Helmet," directed by Samuel Fuller. He went on to appear in several other Fuller films, including "Fixed Bayonets!" and "Park Row."

Brodie also had a successful television career, appearing in shows like "Perry Mason," "Gunsmoke," and "The Twilight Zone." He also made appearances on popular game shows of the time, including "The Price is Right" and "To Tell the Truth."

In addition to acting, Brodie was known for his personal life. In 1940, he gained fame for allegedly jumping off the Brooklyn Bridge and surviving. However, this claim has been widely disputed. Brodie also owned a popular bar in Hollywood during the 1950s and 60s, frequented by many celebrities of the era.

Steve Brodie retired from acting in the late 1970s and spent his later years living in West Hills, California. He passed away in January 1992 at the age of 72.

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Fritz Leiber

Fritz Leiber (December 24, 1910 Chicago-September 5, 1992 San Francisco) a.k.a. Fritz Leiber, Jr., Fritz Reuter Leiber Jr., Fritz Lieber, F. Lieber, Maurice Bre├žon, Fritz R. Leiber, Fritz Leiber, Jnr. or Fritz Reuter Leiber, Jr. was an American writer, novelist, poet, actor and playwright. His child is called Justin Leiber.

Leiber was best known for his works in the fantasy, horror and science-fiction genres. He received numerous honors and awards for his contributions to the field of speculative fiction, including multiple Hugo, Nebula and World Fantasy Awards. Leiber also wrote for film, television and radio, and acted in a few productions himself. In addition to his writing, he was heavily involved in the wargaming community and even helped to develop a popular tabletop game called "Fafhrd and the Gray Mouser." Leiber passed away in 1992 from heart failure at the age of 81. His contributions to the genre continue to inspire new generations of writers and readers alike.

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Hank Worden

Hank Worden (July 23, 1901 Rolfe-December 6, 1992 Los Angeles) also known as Norton Earl Worden, Hank Warden, Worden Norton, Heber Snow, Norton E. 'Hank' Warden or Worden Norten was an American actor, tour guide, wrangler and cowboy. He had one child, Dawn Henry.

Hank Worden was best known for his roles in western films, where he often played a sidekick or supporting character. He appeared in over 200 films and television shows throughout his career, including "Red River," "The Searchers," and "Twin Peaks."

Before becoming an actor, Worden worked as a cowboy and toured the United States as a rodeo clown. He even spent time as a tour guide at the Grand Canyon, where he would perform rope tricks and tell stories for visitors.

Despite his prolific career in Hollywood, Worden remained humble and true to his cowboy roots. He was known for his kind personality and often helped out with stunts and wrangling on set.

Worden passed away at the age of 91 in Los Angeles, California. He is remembered as a beloved character actor and iconic cowboy in film history.

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C. V. Wood

C. V. Wood (December 17, 1920 Woods County-March 14, 1992 Houston) a.k.a. Woody, Cornelius Vanderbilt Wood Jr., Cornelius Vanderbilt Wood or C.V. Wood Jr. was an American businessperson and actor.

He is most famously known as the man who built Disneyland. Wood was a key player in the development of the Disneyland theme park, working alongside Walt Disney himself to bring the project to life. In addition to his work in the theme park industry, Wood was also a successful actor in the 1940s and 1950s. He appeared in several films, including "Lady in the Lake" and "The Great Lover". Later in life, Wood became involved in real estate development and ended up building multiple shopping centers across the United States. Despite not being as well-known as some of his contemporaries in the entertainment industry, Wood's contributions to the world of theme parks and real estate development have left a lasting legacy.

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Robert Joel

Robert Joel (August 4, 1944 Macon-September 30, 1992 Riverside) was an American actor.

He started his acting career in theater productions and later moved to television and film. Joel is best known for his roles in movies like "Goodfellas" and "Raging Bull". He also appeared on popular TV shows such as "Miami Vice" and "The Sopranos". Joel's acting talent was widely recognized in the industry, earning him nominations for various awards, including the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actor. Unfortunately, his life was cut short due to complications from AIDS, and he passed away at the age of 48. Joel's legacy lives on through his impressive body of work and his contribution to the film and television industry.

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Skip Stephenson

Skip Stephenson (April 18, 1940 Omaha-May 18, 1992) a.k.a. Charles F. Stephenson was an American comedian and actor.

He is best known for his role on "The Real Don Steele Show" as the co-host from 1966 to 1969. He later appeared on various television shows including "The Love Boat", "Fantasy Island", and "The Jeffersons". Stephenson also hosted his own game show called "The Krypton Factor" in 1981. In addition to his work on television, he also had a successful career in stand-up comedy and was a regular performer at The Comedy Store in Los Angeles. Sadly, he passed away at the age of 52 due to pancreatic cancer.

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John Anderson

John Anderson (October 20, 1922 Clayton-August 7, 1992 Sherman Oaks) also known as John Robert Anderson was an American actor and film director.

Anderson was born in Clayton, Illinois in 1922. He started his career as a theatre actor before transitioning to film and television. He appeared in over 500 television shows and films during his career, including notable role in The Untouchables, Gunsmoke, and Psycho. In addition to his acting work, Anderson was also a film director and worked on several episodes of the popular western series, Bonanza.

Anderson was known for his versatile and commanding screen presence, often portraying tough and authoritative characters. His performances in The High Chaparral and MacGyver are still remembered for their intensity and emotional depth. Anderson passed away in 1992 at the age of 69 due to complications from hip surgery. Despite his untimely death, his contributions to the film and television industry continue to be celebrated and honored to this day.

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Marshall Thompson

Marshall Thompson (November 27, 1925 Peoria-May 18, 1992 Royal Oak) also known as James Marshall Thompson or J. Marsh Thomson was an American actor. His child is called Janet Thompson.

Thompson began his acting career in the 1940s and quickly rose to fame. He appeared in numerous films and television shows throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including "To Hell and Back," "Daktari," and "The Asphalt Jungle." In addition to acting, Thompson was also a successful film producer and director, known for his work on the hit television series "Make Room for Daddy" and "Flipper."

Beyond his success in the entertainment industry, Thompson was also an avid animal rights advocate and conservationist. He established the Marshall Thompson Foundation for Wildlife and Habitat Conservation, which aimed to protect endangered species and their natural habitats. Thompson's commitment to environmental causes earned him several honors and awards throughout his lifetime, including the Wildlife Conservation Award from the National Wildlife Federation.

Thompson continued to act and work in the film industry until his death in 1992 at the age of 66. His legacy as an actor, filmmaker, and conservationist lives on through his many contributions to the arts and the environment.

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Sam Kinison

Sam Kinison (December 8, 1953 Yakima-April 10, 1992 Needles) also known as Samuel Burl Kinison or Sam was an American comedian, actor and screenwriter.

Kinison rose to fame in the 1980s for his intense and often controversial stand-up comedy style, which often touched on sensitive topics such as religion and politics. He also made several appearances in films and television shows, including "Married... with Children" and "Back to School." Kinison struggled with addiction throughout much of his life and tragically died in a car accident in 1992 at the age of 38. Despite his relatively short career, Kinison is remembered as one of the most influential comedians of his time and continues to be celebrated for his unique style and fearlessness on stage.

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Ray Danton

Ray Danton (September 19, 1931 New York City-February 11, 1992 Los Angeles) also known as Raymond Kaplan, Raymond Danton or Raymond Caplan was an American film director, actor, television director, television producer and screenwriter. He had two children, Steve Danton and Mitchell Danton.

Danton began his career as an actor in the 1950s, appearing in films such as "The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond" and "The George Raft Story." He also had roles in television shows such as "The Untouchables" and "The Twilight Zone." In the 1960s, he began directing and producing films and television shows, including episodes of "The F.B.I." and "Charlie's Angels." Danton's most notable film as a director was the 1974 crime drama "The Killers."

Throughout his career, Danton was known for his good looks and suave demeanor, which earned him roles in numerous films and television shows. However, he also had a reputation as a difficult personality on set and struggled with alcoholism. After his death from kidney failure in 1992, Danton was buried in Hollywood Forever Cemetery.

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Eric Sevareid

Eric Sevareid (November 26, 1912 Velva-July 9, 1992 Washington, D.C.) also known as Arnold Eric Sevareid or Eric Severeid was an American writer, journalist, commentator, actor and screenwriter.

Throughout his career spanning several decades, Eric Sevareid served as a correspondent for CBS News, covering major events such as World War II, the Cold War, and Vietnam War. He was especially well-known for his coverage of the 1952 presidential election, during which he inaccurately predicted a victory for Republican candidate Dwight D. Eisenhower.

In addition to his work as a journalist, Sevareid also wrote a number of books, including memoirs, political analyses, and historical works. He appeared as himself in several films and television programs, and even wrote the screenplay for the 1956 Western film "The Way West."

Sevareid was recognized for his outstanding contributions to journalism with numerous accolades, including several Emmy Awards, the George Polk Award, and induction into the Television Hall of Fame. He passed away in 1992 at the age of 79.

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Wayde Preston

Wayde Preston (September 10, 1929 Denver-February 6, 1992 Lovelock) otherwise known as William Erskine Strange, Wade Preston or William Erksine Strange was an American actor.

He is best known for his role as Christopher Colt in the popular television series, "Colt .45" which aired from 1957 to 1960. Prior to his acting career, Preston served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. After his time in the army, he started as a radio disc jockey before moving to acting in the early 1950s. He appeared in several films throughout the 1950s, including "The Ten Commandments" and "Gunfight at the O.K. Corral." In addition to his work on "Colt .45," Preston also appeared in a number of other television shows, such as "The Virginian" and "Bonanza." He passed away at the age of 62 due to colon cancer in 1992.

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Peter Brocco

Peter Brocco (January 16, 1903 Reading-December 20, 1992 Los Angeles) also known as Carl Peter Brocco was an American actor.

He began his acting career on stage and later transitioned to film and television. He appeared in over 100 films throughout his career, including "The Killers," "The Caine Mutiny," and "The Return of the Fly." Brocco was also a regular on television, making appearances on popular shows such as "The Twilight Zone," "Perry Mason," and "Bonanza." He was known for his ability to play a variety of characters, from villains to wise old men. In addition to his acting career, Brocco was also a skilled artist and painter. He continued to act throughout his life, making his final on-screen appearance in the 1991 film "Kafka."

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Paul Henreid

Paul Henreid (January 10, 1908 Trieste-March 29, 1992 Santa Monica) also known as Paul Georg Julius Hernried Ritter Von Wassel-Waldingau, Paul Georg Julius Hernreid Von Wassel-Waldingau, Paul Von Hernried, Paul von Henreid, Paul von Hernreid or Paul Georg Julius Freiherr von Hernried Ritter von Wassel-Waldingau was an American film director, actor and television director. His children are called Monika Henreid and Mimi Duncan.

Henreid was born in Trieste, Austria-Hungary (now Italy) and began his acting career on stage in Vienna before moving to Hollywood in the early 1940s. He became known for his role as the romantic lead in the classics Casablanca and Now, Voyager opposite Ingrid Bergman and Bette Davis, respectively.

Henreid also starred in several other notable films including Goodbye, Mr. Chips, Of Human Bondage, and The Spanish Main. He transitioned to directing in the 1950s and worked on shows such as Alfred Hitchcock Presents, Maverick, and The Twilight Zone.

Outside of his film career, Henreid was involved in politics and was an advocate for human rights. He wrote a memoir in 1984 titled Ladies Man: An Autobiography where he detailed his experiences in Hollywood and his personal life. He passed away in 1992 in Santa Monica, California and is buried in the Santa Maria della Scala Cemetery in his hometown of Trieste.

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Jilly Rizzo

Jilly Rizzo (May 6, 1917 New York City-May 6, 1992 Rancho Mirage) otherwise known as Ermenigildo "Jilly" Rizzo or Ermenigildo Rizzo was an American presenter, restaurateur, entertainer, actor and entrepreneur.

Jilly Rizzo was best known for his friendship with the legendary singer Frank Sinatra. Sinatra referred to Rizzo as his "right-hand man" and Rizzo would often be seen by his side at public functions and events. Rizzo ran several successful nightclubs and restaurants, including Jilly's Saloon, which became a hotspot for celebrities in New York City. He also had small roles in several films, including "The Godfather" and "Dirty Dingus Magee." Rizzo passed away on his 75th birthday in a car accident in which he was driving under the influence.

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David Carroll

David Carroll (July 30, 1950 Rockville Centre-March 11, 1992 New York City) a.k.a. David-James Carroll or David James Carroll was an American singer and actor.

He is best known for his work in musical theater, particularly for his performances in the original Broadway productions of "Carmen Jones" and "Chess". Carroll also appeared in several television shows and films, including "Miami Vice" and "Law & Order". He started his career as a backup singer for many recording artists, including Barbra Streisand, before transitioning to the stage. In addition to his acting career, Carroll was also a prolific recording artist, releasing several albums throughout his career, including "Setting the Standards" and "David Carroll Sings ABBA, With a Twist". He died of AIDS-related complications in 1992 at the age of 41.

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Ronald Sinclair

Ronald Sinclair (January 21, 1924 Dunedin-November 22, 1992 Woodland Hills) also known as Ron Sinclair, Richard Arthur Hould or Ra Hould was an American film editor, actor, television editor and soldier.

He was born in New Zealand and began his career as an actor in Hollywood in the 1940s. He acted in films such as "The Adventures of Tom Sawyer" and "Little Lord Fauntleroy." During World War II, he served in the United States Army, where he was awarded the Purple Heart and the Bronze Star for his bravery in combat.

After the war, Sinclair turned his attention to film editing and worked on many notable films, including "The Great White Hope," "The Omega Man," and "Escape from the Planet of the Apes." He also worked as a television editor on shows such as "The Lucy Show," "The Andy Griffith Show," and "F Troop."

In addition to his work in the film industry, Sinclair was an accomplished musician, playing the clarinet and saxophone in bands in both New Zealand and the United States.

Sinclair passed away in 1992 at the age of 68, leaving behind a legacy of outstanding work in film and television.

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Freddie Bartholomew

Freddie Bartholomew (March 28, 1924 Harlesden-January 23, 1992 Sarasota) also known as Frederick Cecil Bartholomew or Fred Bartholomew was an American actor and film producer. He had three children, Kathleen Millicent Bartholomew, Frederick R. Bartholomew and Celia Ann Paul.

Bartholomew began his acting career at the young age of six in the British film "Say It With Music" and quickly became a child star. He moved to Hollywood in the 1930s and starred in several notable films such as "Little Lord Fauntleroy" and "Captains Courageous" alongside Spencer Tracy. Despite his success in the film industry, Bartholomew retired from acting in the 1940s and went on to become a successful real estate agent in Beverly Hills. Later in life, he moved to Sarasota, Florida, where he passed away in 1992 at the age of 67.

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Jimmy Lennon

Jimmy Lennon (April 13, 1913 Saint Paul-April 20, 1992 Santa Monica) also known as Jimmy Lennon Sr., James F. Lennon or James Lennon was an American sports commentator, announcer and actor. He had four children, Jimmy Lennon, Jr., Scott Lennon, Robin Thomas and Kim Fitzgerald.

Jimmy Lennon Sr. began his career as a ring announcer in 1944 at the Olympic Auditorium in Los Angeles. He became one of the most recognizable voices in boxing, famously announcing the catchphrase "It's showtime!" before big fights. In addition to boxing, Lennon Sr. also announced for wrestling and roller derby events.

Aside from his announcing career, Lennon Sr. also appeared in several films, including "Requiem for a Heavyweight" and "Rocky." He also had a small role in the TV series "The Beverly Hillbillies." Lennon Sr. was known for his distinctive voice and style of announcing, and was regarded as one of the pioneers of modern sports announcing.

His son, Jimmy Lennon Jr., has continued his father's legacy, also becoming a famous ring announcer in his own right.

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Robert Reed

Robert Reed (October 19, 1932 Highland Park-May 12, 1992 Pasadena) a.k.a. John Robert Rietz or John Robert Rietz, Jr was an American actor. His child is called Karen Rietz.

Reed was best known for his portrayal of Mike Brady on the television series "The Brady Bunch" (1969-1974) and its various spin-offs and sequels. Prior to that, he had a successful stage career and appeared in numerous television shows and films, including "Bloodlust!" (1961) and "The Defenders" (1961-1965). Reed was also an advocate for LGBTQ rights, having come out as gay in the late 1970s. He died in 1992 from colon cancer complications, at the age of 59.

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George Murphy

George Murphy (July 4, 1902 New Haven-May 3, 1992 Palm Beach) also known as George Lloyd Murphy was an American politician, actor and dancer. He had two children, Melissa Elaine Murphy and Dennis Michael Murphy.

Murphy began his career as a dancer and performed in several Broadway musicals. He made his film debut in 1930 and went on to appear in over 45 films, including "Broadway Melody of 1938" and "Battleground." In 1952, he was elected to the U.S. Senate for California and served for one term, from 1953 to 1959. During his time in the Senate, he served on several committees, including the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Appropriations. After leaving politics, Murphy became a successful businessman and served on several corporate boards. He was also active in philanthropy and supported several charities, including the American Heart Association and the United Cerebral Palsy Association. Murphy was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame for his contributions to the entertainment industry.

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Eddie Fontaine

Eddie Fontaine (March 6, 1927 Springfield-April 13, 1992) also known as Fontaine, Eddie was an American singer and actor.

He began his career in the 1940s as a vocalist with various big bands, including those of Benny Carter and Charlie Barnet. In the 1950s, he signed with Decca Records and had a hit with the song "Nothin' Shakin' (But the Leaves on the Trees)." He also appeared in several films, including "The Girl Can't Help It" and "A Little Bit of Heaven." Fontaine later transitioned to television, where he made guest appearances on several popular shows of the time, including "Bonanza" and "Perry Mason." Despite his success in entertainment, he eventually retired from show business in the 1970s and became a successful businessman.

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Hari Rhodes

Hari Rhodes (April 10, 1932 Cincinnati-January 15, 1992 Canoga Park) also known as Harry Rhodes was an American actor and writer.

He is best known for his role as Sgt. Edward "Chief" Bell in the 1960s TV series "Daktari". Prior to his acting career, Rhodes served in the United States Air Force and worked as a commercial artist. He made his acting debut in 1959 in an episode of "The Donna Reed Show" and went on to appear in numerous TV shows and films. Some of his notable roles include appearances in "Peyton Place", "Rawhide", "Mission: Impossible", and "In the Heat of the Night". In addition to his acting work, Rhodes was also a writer and authored several plays and screenplays throughout his career. He passed away at the age of 59 from complications of emphysema.

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Hank Penny

Hank Penny (September 18, 1918 Birmingham-April 17, 1992 California) also known as Penny, Hank, Herbert Clayton Penny or Hank Penny and His Plantation Boys was an American actor, musician and comedian. His children are called Sydney Penny, Greg Penny, Bill Penny, Patricia Penny and Sandra Penny.

Hank Penny was a talented musician and performer. He was known for playing the steel guitar, and he was one of the pioneers of the Western swing genre. He began his career in the 1930s, performing with various bands and touring throughout the United States. In the 1940s, he formed his own band, Hank Penny and His Plantation Boys, and they achieved great success with hits like "Steel Guitar Stomp" and "Hold the Phone."

In addition to his music career, Hank Penny was also a successful actor and comedian. He appeared in a number of films and television shows throughout the 1950s and 1960s, often playing comedic roles. He was also a regular on the television variety show "Town Hall Party" in the 1950s.

Hank Penny had five children with his wife, Shari Penny, and his daughter, Sydney Penny, went on to become an actress. Hank Penny passed away on April 17, 1992, in California, but his influence on music and entertainment continues to be felt to this day.

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William Keene

William Keene (August 4, 1915 Pennsylvania-May 23, 1992 Los Angeles) also known as Wm. Keene, Wm Keene or William Joseph Keene was an American actor.

He appeared in more than 30 films and television shows during his career, including "Bedlam" (1946), "The Wild One" (1953) and "The Ten Commandments" (1956). Keene also had a successful career on stage, appearing in plays such as "Abie's Irish Rose" and "The Voice of the Turtle." He began his acting career in radio during the 1930s, and went on to become a prolific character actor in the early days of television. Keene was married to actress Mary Field from 1943 until his death in 1992.

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