American movie stars born in 1921

Here are 50 famous actresses from United States of America were born in 1921:

Betty Friedan

Betty Friedan (February 4, 1921 Peoria-February 4, 2006 Washington, D.C.) a.k.a. Betty Naomi Goldstein Friedan or Bettye Naomi Goldstein was an American writer, author and actor. She had three children, Emily Friedan, Jonathan Friedan and Daniel Friedan.

Friedan is best known for her book, "The Feminine Mystique," which was published in 1963 and is widely credited with igniting the second wave of feminism in the United States. The book focused on the dissatisfaction and frustration felt by middle-class American women who were expected to conform to traditional gender roles and societal expectations.

Friedan co-founded the National Organization for Women (NOW) in 1966, which became a leading voice for women's rights and helped to bring attention to issues such as workplace discrimination, reproductive rights and equal pay.

In addition to her work as a feminist activist, Friedan also had a successful career as a journalist and writer. She wrote several other books on feminism and women's issues, including "The Second Stage" and "The Fountain of Age."

Friedan passed away in 2006 on her 85th birthday in Washington, D.C. She is remembered as one of the most influential figures of the feminist movement and a passionate advocate for women's rights.

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Betty Hutton

Betty Hutton (February 26, 1921 Battle Creek-March 11, 2007 Palm Springs) also known as Elizabeth June Thornburg, Hutton, Betty, Bettty Hutton, Betty Darling or Betty Jane Boyer was an American singer and actor. Her children are called Candice Briskin, Lindsay Briskin and Caroline Candoli.

Betty Hutton was born in Battle Creek, Michigan, and was the youngest of three daughters. She began performing at a young age, singing and dancing in her local church choir. After moving to New York City in the early 1940s, she began performing in nightclubs and landed her first Broadway role in the musical "Two for the Show" in 1940.

Hutton gained fame as a Hollywood star during the 1940s and 1950s, starring in films such as "Annie Get Your Gun" and "The Greatest Show on Earth." She was known for her vibrant and energetic performances and her signature blonde hair.

In addition to her successful acting career, Hutton was also a talented singer and recorded several popular songs, including "It Had to Be You" and "Doctor, Lawyer, Indian Chief." She was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the film "The Miracle of Morgan's Creek."

Hutton had a tumultuous personal life, including struggles with addiction and multiple marriages. She retired from acting in the 1960s and spent her later years focusing on her family and charitable work. She passed away in 2007 at the age of 86.

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Carol Channing

Carol Channing (January 31, 1921 Seattle-) also known as Carol Elaine Channing is an American singer, actor and comedian. She has one child, Channing Carson.

Carol Channing is best known for her performances on Broadway, including her portrayal of Lorelei Lee in "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" and Dolly Gallagher Levi in "Hello, Dolly!". She received four Tony Awards throughout her career, as well as a Lifetime Achievement Tony Award in 1995. In addition to her stage work, Channing appeared in several films and television shows, and released numerous albums. She was also known for her distinctive voice and signature blonde curls. Channing was an advocate for the arts and education, and helped establish the California Poets in the Schools program. She passed away on January 15, 2019 at the age of 97.

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Deanna Durbin

Deanna Durbin (December 4, 1921 Winnipeg-April 20, 2013 Neauphle-le-Ch√Ęteau) also known as Winnipeg`s Sweetheart, deanna_durbin, Edna Mae Durbin or Durbin, Deanna was an American singer and actor. She had two children, Jessica Louise Jackson and Peter David.

Deanna Durbin began her career as a child star in the 1930s with the film "Every Sunday." She then went on to star in a string of successful musical films such as "Three Smart Girls" and "One Hundred Men and a Girl." Durbin's popularity was so great that she was credited for saving Universal Studios from bankruptcy.

Throughout the 1940s, Durbin continued to star in successful films like "It Started with Eve" and "Lady on a Train." However, after eleven years of being in the spotlight, Durbin abruptly retired from acting in 1949 at the age of 27. She moved to France with her third husband and focused on raising her family.

Despite her early retirement, Deanna Durbin's musical legacy continued to be celebrated for generations. She was considered one of the most talented singers of her time and had a soprano voice that was both powerful and sweet. Her films and recordings continue to be cherished classics of the Golden Age of Hollywood.

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Nancy Kulp

Nancy Kulp (August 28, 1921 Harrisburg-February 3, 1991 Palm Desert) also known as Nancy Jane Kulp, Kulp, Nancy, Slim or Nancy Culp was an American politician, actor and voice actor.

She is best known for her role as Miss Jane Hathaway on the popular sitcom "The Beverly Hillbillies" which aired from 1962 to 1971. She also appeared in several other TV shows and films throughout her career, including "The Bob Cummings Show" and "Sanford and Son."

In addition to her acting career, Kulp also ran for political office. She ran for the U.S. House of Representatives twice in Pennsylvania but was unsuccessful each time. She later served as a delegate to the 1980 Democratic National Convention.

Kulp was also a trained linguist and worked for the United States Army during World War II as a translator and decoder. She passed away in 1991 at the age of 69 due to cancer.

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Donna Reed

Donna Reed (January 27, 1921 Denison-January 14, 1986 Beverly Hills) also known as Donnabelle Mullenger or Donna Belle Mullenger was an American actor. She had four children, Anthony Owen, Timothy Owen, Mary Anne Owen and Penny Jane Owen.

Reed began her career as a contract player for MGM studios in the 1940s. She was renowned for her wholesome and girl-next-door image, which she portrayed in films such as "The Picture of Dorian Gray" (1945) and "It's a Wonderful Life" (1946). In 1953, she starred as Lorene Burke in "From Here to Eternity" which won the Best Picture Oscar.

Reed also found success on television, starring in her own sitcom, "The Donna Reed Show" which aired from 1958 to 1966. She received a Golden Globe for her role on the show, which chronicled the life of a suburban stay-at-home mother.

Apart from her acting career, Reed was also active in politics, campaigning for various causes including nuclear disarmament and the Equal Rights Amendment. She was also involved in charities, advocating for mental illness and promoting the importance of education.

After her death in 1986 from pancreatic cancer, her philanthropic efforts were recognized with a posthumous humanitarian award from the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences.

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Esther Williams

Esther Williams (August 8, 1921 Inglewood-June 6, 2013 Los Angeles) also known as Esther Jane Williams, America's Mermaid, Ester Jane Williams or Williams, Esther was an American swimmer, actor and businessperson. She had three children, Benjamin Gage, Kimball Gage and Susan Gage.

After starting her career as a competitive swimmer, Esther Williams went on to become a successful Hollywood actress in the 1940s and 1950s. She starred in popular films such as "Bathing Beauty," "Million Dollar Mermaid," and "Jupiter's Darling." Williams was known for her synchronized swimming performances and her graceful swimming style, which made her a unique presence in Hollywood. In addition to her acting career, Williams also launched her own successful swimwear line and wrote several books, including her autobiography "The Million Dollar Mermaid." She passed away in 2013 at the age of 91.

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Jan Sterling

Jan Sterling (April 3, 1921 Manhattan-March 26, 2004 Woodland Hills) a.k.a. Jane Sterling Adriance, Jan Sterling Adriance, Jane Adrian, Jane, Jane Sterling, Jane Adriance or Jane Darian was an American actor. Her children are called Adams Douglas and Celia Douglas.

Jan Sterling began her acting career on stage, making her Broadway debut in 1947 in the play "Bachelor Born." She made her film debut in 1949 in the movie "Johnny Belinda," receiving critical acclaim for her performance. Throughout the 1950s, she appeared in a number of films, including "Ace in the Hole" and "The High and the Mighty," for which she was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress.

Sterling also had a successful television career, appearing in a number of television shows, such as "Rawhide," "The Twilight Zone," and "Bonanza." She continued to act in films and television throughout the 1960s and 1970s, and was last seen on screen in the 1994 movie "A Face to Die For."

Off screen, Sterling was known for her activism and was a supporter of various political causes, including civil rights and women's rights. She was married twice, first to actor John Merivale and later to financier and businessman Paul Douglas, with whom she had her two children. Sterling passed away in 2004 at the age of 82.

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Jane Russell

Jane Russell (June 21, 1921 Bemidji-February 28, 2011 Santa Maria) also known as Ernestine Jane Geraldine Russell was an American model, actor and singer. She had three children, Tracy Waterfield, Thomas Waterfield and Robert Waterfield.

Jane Russell was born in Minnesota but grew up in California. In the 1940s, she gained national attention as a pin-up model, often photographed in revealing outfits. This led to her Hollywood career, with her debut in the Howard Hughes-produced film "The Outlaw" (1943).

She went on to star in several notable films, including "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes" (1953), opposite Marilyn Monroe. Russell was also known for her singing career, releasing several albums throughout the 1950s and 1960s.

Beyond her entertainment career, Russell was a devoted Catholic and philanthropist. She founded the World Adoption International Fund and personally adopted several children from overseas. Russell was also a supporter of cancer research, a cause close to her heart after her own experience with the disease.

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Lana Turner

Lana Turner (February 8, 1921 Wallace-June 29, 1995 Century City) a.k.a. Julia Jean Mildred Frances Turner, Judy, Julia Jean Turner, Sweater Girl or Julia Turner was an American actor. Her child is called Cheryl Crane.

Lana Turner began her career as a model in the late 1930s before making her film debut in 1937 in "They Won't Forget." She quickly became known for her beauty and sensuality, earning the nickname "The Sweater Girl" due to her iconic fashion choices in films. Turner starred in several films throughout the 1940s and 1950s, including "The Postman Always Rings Twice" (1946) and "Peyton Place" (1957), earning critical acclaim for her performances. She received an Academy Award nomination for her role in "Peyton Place." Turner's personal life was also the subject of much attention, particularly her seven marriages and various scandals. She continued to act in films and on television throughout the 1960s and 1970s before retiring from acting.

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Linda Stirling

Linda Stirling (October 11, 1921 Long Beach-July 20, 1997 Los Angeles) a.k.a. Louise Schultz was an American model and actor. She had two children, Christopher Nibley and Timothy Nibley.

Stirling was best known for her roles in a series of Republic Pictures serials in the 1940s, including "The Tiger Woman" and "Zorro's Black Whip." She was also a frequent supporting actress in westerns and musicals. In addition to her work in film and television, Stirling was a successful model and appeared on several magazine covers in the 1940s. She retired from acting in the 1950s but continued to work as a model and also pursued a career in real estate. Stirling was inducted into the Hall of Great Western Performers at the National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum in Oklahoma City in 2007.

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Marilyn Maxwell

Marilyn Maxwell (August 3, 1921 Clarinda-March 20, 1972 Beverly Hills) a.k.a. Marvel Marilyn Maxwell, Marvel Maxwell, Maxwell, Marilyn or Mrs. Bob Hope was an American actor and singer. Her child is called Matthew Paul Davis.

Maxwell was born as Marvel Marilyn Maxwell and grew up in Clarinda, Iowa. She started her career as a band vocalist and was signed by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) in the 1940s. She went on to star in several films including "Lost in a Harem" (1944), "The Lemon Drop Kid" (1951), and "The Phantom Planet" (1961).

Maxwell was a popular performer in nightclubs and television, and she appeared on several variety shows including "The Red Skelton Show" and "The Ed Sullivan Show." She was also a regular on Bob Hope's USO tours during World War II and the Korean War.

In addition to her acting and singing career, Maxwell was also an accomplished horse breeder and owned a ranch in Malibu, California. She was married twice, first to actor John Conte and then to jazz pianist and composer Jerry Gray.

Maxwell passed away at the age of 50 due to heart failure while undergoing surgery in Beverly Hills.

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Nancy Kelly

Nancy Kelly (March 25, 1921 Lowell-January 2, 1995 Bel-Air) also known as Brunette Nancy Kelly was an American actor. Her child is called Kelly Lurie Caro.

Nancy Kelly began her career on Broadway, where she received rave reviews for her role in "The Command to Love". She then transitioned to film, where she starred in several movies including "Jesse James", "The Bad Seed" and "The Day the Earth Stood Still". Kelly was nominated for an Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in "The Bad Seed".

Throughout the 1950s, Kelly made several television appearances, including "Studio One", "Playhouse 90", and "Alcoa Presents: One Step Beyond". She also appeared on the popular game show "To Tell the Truth" as a panelist.

Kelly continued to act on stage and screen throughout the 1960s, but her career slowed down in the 1970s. She made her final acting appearance in the 1981 film "A Christmas Without Snow".

In addition to her work in entertainment, Kelly was active in politics and social causes. She was a vocal advocate for women's rights and was an early supporter of the Equal Rights Amendment.

Nancy Kelly passed away in 1995 at the age of 73 from complications from a stroke.

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Sheila Ryan

Sheila Ryan (June 8, 1921 Topeka-November 4, 1975 Woodland Hills) a.k.a. Katherine Elizabeth McLaughlin, Betty McLaughlin or Betty McLauglin was an American actor. Her child is called Kerry Buttram-Galgano.

Ryan started her career as a dancer before transitioning into acting. She appeared in over 60 films throughout the 1940s and 50s, including "Dillinger," "Song of the Thin Man," and "Canyon River." She also had roles on several television shows, including "Dragnet" and "The Lone Ranger."

Ryan was married to several notable actors, including James Craig and Allan Lane, before marrying actor Pat Buttram in 1962. After retiring from acting, Ryan devoted herself to philanthropy work, supporting various causes such as animal welfare and cancer research. She passed away in 1975 at the age of 54 from lung cancer.

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Susan Peters

Susan Peters (July 3, 1921 Spokane-October 23, 1952 Visalia) otherwise known as Suzanne Carnahan was an American actor. Her child is called Timothy Richard Quine.

Susan Peters began her acting career in 1940 and quickly gained acclaim for her performances in films such as "The Big Shot" and "Random Harvest". She was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Supporting Actress for her role in the 1942 film "The Proudly".

In 1945, Peters' life took a tragic turn when she was accidentally shot by her husband, actor Richard Quine. The bullet severed her spinal cord and left her paralyzed from the waist down. Despite her injury, Peters continued to act and was featured in several films and TV shows, including the film "Sign of the Ram".

Peters' injury also led her to become an advocate for disability rights and she became a spokesperson for the Paralyzed Veterans of America. She passed away in 1952 from pneumonia, which was complicated by her injuries. Despite her short career, Peters' talent and spirit have made her a beloved figure in Hollywood history.

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Vera-Ellen

Vera-Ellen (February 16, 1921 Norwood-August 30, 1981 Los Angeles) a.k.a. Vera-Ellen Westmeyer Rohe, Vera Ellen, Bunny or Vera Ellen Westmeier Rohe was an American actor and dancer. Her child is called Victoria Ellen Rothschild.

Vera-Ellen began her career as a dancer on Broadway, performing in shows such as "Very Warm for May" and "By Jupiter". She then transitioned to the silver screen, starring in musical films such as "On the Town", "White Christmas", and "The Belle of New York". Vera-Ellen was known for her incredible dance skills and acrobatics, often performing challenging routines with ease. She retired from acting in the early 1960s, and spent the rest of her life out of the public eye. Despite her success, Vera-Ellen faced struggles with anorexia and other health issues throughout her life. She passed away at the age of 60 due to complications from cancer. Today, she is remembered as one of Hollywood's most talented and iconic dancers.

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Vivian Blaine

Vivian Blaine (November 21, 1921 Newark-December 9, 1995 New York City) also known as Vivian Stapleton or Blaine, Vivian was an American actor and singer.

She was best known for her role as Adelaide in the original Broadway production of Guys and Dolls, a role she reprised in the film adaptation. Blaine also appeared in several other films, including Jitterbugs and Something for the Boys, as well as television shows such as The Twilight Zone and The Lucy Show. In addition to her acting career, she also had a successful singing career and recorded several albums throughout her lifetime. Outside of her professional life, Blaine was known for her philanthropic efforts and was involved in various charities and organizations, including the American Cancer Society, the March of Dimes, and UNICEF.

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Vivian Dandridge

Vivian Dandridge (April 22, 1921 Cleveland-October 26, 1991 Seattle) a.k.a. Vivian Alferetta Dandridge, The Dandridge Sisters, Vivi or Marina Rozell was an American singer and actor. She had one child, Michael Emmett Wallace.

Vivian Dandridge was a part of the Dandridge Sisters, a successful all-female trio that became popular in the 1930s and 1940s. They were known for their close harmonies and tap dancing. Vivian also had a successful solo career as a singer and actor. She appeared in several films and television shows, including "Carmen Jones" and "The Ford Television Theatre". She was also a prominent figure in the Civil Rights Movement, using her platform to advocate for equal rights and racial justice. Aside from her music and activism, Vivian also had a passion for fashion and was known for her impeccable style.

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Diana Barrymore

Diana Barrymore (March 3, 1921 New York City-January 25, 1960 New York City) a.k.a. Diana Blanche Barrymore Blythe or Diana Blanche Barrymore was an American actor and pin-up girl.

She was the daughter of acclaimed actor John Barrymore and his second wife, poet Blanche Oelrichs. Diana followed in her father's footsteps and pursued a career in acting, appearing in a number of films in the 1940s and 1950s. She is best known for her roles in movies like "Nightmare" (1942) and "Between Two Worlds" (1944).

Despite her success on screen, Diana's personal life was tumultuous. She struggled with alcoholism and drug addiction, and was known for her turbulent relationships with men. She was married and divorced four times, including to fellow actor Bramwell Fletcher and tennis player John Howard.

Diana's life was cut short at the age of 38 due to heart failure brought on by her years of substance abuse. Her tragic story has been chronicled in numerous books and films, and she remains a fascinating and complex figure in Hollywood history.

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Patsy Garrett

Patsy Garrett (May 4, 1921 Atlantic City-) also known as The Chow-Chow-Chow Lady, Virginia Garrett or Virginia "Patsy" Garrett is an American actor, singer and radio personality. Her children are called Kathy Kokinacis and Jeff Kokinacis.

Patsy Garrett began her career as a radio personality in the 1940s before transitioning to television and film. She is best known for her role as nosy neighbor, Betty Ramsey, in the television series, "Nanny and the Professor" and as the voice of several animated characters including Cottontail in "Benji's Very Own Christmas Story". She also appeared in popular TV shows such as "The Donna Reed Show", "The Andy Griffith Show", and "The Love Boat". Garrett continued to work in the entertainment industry well into her 80s, with her last on-screen appearance in the 2006 film, "Broken Bridges". In addition to her acting work, Garrett was also a talented singer who recorded several albums throughout her career.

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Ann Savage

Ann Savage (February 19, 1921 Columbia-December 25, 2008 Hollywood) also known as Bernice Lyon or Bernice Maxine Lyon was an American actor.

Savage was best known for her role as Vera in the 1945 film noir "Detour." She began her career in the early 1940s, appearing in a number of B-movies before landing her breakthrough role in "Detour." After the success of the film, Savage continued to act in a variety of films throughout the 1940s and 1950s, though she never achieved the same level of fame she had with "Detour." In the 1960s, she transitioned to television work, appearing in popular shows such as "Perry Mason" and "The Twilight Zone." Savage took a break from acting in the 1970s and 1980s, but returned to the screen in the 1990s with roles in films like "Firecracker" and "Mighty Ducks the Movie: The First Face-Off." She continued to act sporadically until her death in 2008 at the age of 87.

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Peggy Rea

Peggy Rea (March 31, 1921 Los Angeles-February 5, 2011 Toluca Lake) otherwise known as Margaret Rea, Peggy Rae or Peggy Jane Rea was an American actor.

With a career spanning more than four decades, Peggy Rea appeared in over 150 film and television productions. Born into a show business family, Rea began her acting career as a stage performer before transitioning to film and TV. She had memorable roles in popular TV series such as "The Waltons," "MacGyver," "The Dukes of Hazzard," and "Grace Under Fire." Rea was also known for her work in films such as "Love Field" and "Blazing Saddles." Despite her success in Hollywood, Rea was also known for her contributions to the community. She was an active volunteer for the Hollywood Mobile Library and served as a board member of the Sherman Oaks Neighborhood Council.

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Nancy Reagan

Nancy Reagan (July 6, 1921 Flushing-) a.k.a. Nancy Davis Reagan, Anne Frances Robbins, Mrs. Nancy Reagan, Nancy Davis, Nancy Zarif, First lady Nancy Reagan, Anne Francis Robbins or Nancy is an American actor. She has two children, Ron Reagan and Patti Davis.

In addition to being an actor, Nancy Reagan also served as the First Lady of the United States from 1981 to 1989 during the presidency of her husband, Ronald Reagan. As First Lady, she promoted several initiatives, including the "Just Say No" anti-drug campaign and the Foster Grandparents program. She also worked to improve the White House's collection of art and furniture and to raise private funds to renovate the mansion. After her husband was diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, she became an advocate for stem cell research to find a cure for the disease. Following her husband's death in 2004, she continued to work on Alzheimer's education and research, and founded the Ronald Reagan Institute for Research in Alzheimer's Disease.

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Dagmar

Dagmar (November 29, 1921 Yawkey-October 9, 2001 Ceredo) also known as Virginia Ruth Egnor, Jennie Lewis or Virginia Lewis was an American tv personality, talk show host, actor and pin-up girl.

Dagmar grew up in West Virginia and started her career as a model, posing for magazines such as Yank and Peek. She gained national attention in the 1950s as a television personality and talk show host, known for her blonde bombshell image and silly, playful persona. Dagmar became a popular guest on variety shows and game shows, and she also appeared in films such as "The Second Greatest Sex" (1955) and "Will Success Spoil Rock Hunter?" (1957).

While Dagmar was famous for her looks, she was also a talented performer and actress. She appeared on Broadway in the 1950s and later made guest appearances on television shows such as "The Twilight Zone" and "Burke's Law." Despite her success, Dagmar struggled with alcoholism in her later years and was largely retired from show business by the 1970s. She remained a beloved icon of the 1950s and is remembered today as one of the era's most recognizable and memorable figures.

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Clarice Blackburn

Clarice Blackburn (February 26, 1921 San Francisco-August 5, 1995 New York City) also known as Clarice Blackman was an American actor.

She was best known for her role as Faye Kruger on the soap opera "Days of Our Lives" which she portrayed from 1979 until her death in 1995. Blackburn began her acting career in the 1950s on stage and later became a prolific character actor in television and film. She appeared in shows such as "The Twilight Zone," "The Patty Duke Show," and "Perry Mason." In addition to her acting career, Blackburn was also an accomplished singer and performed in several Broadway musicals. She passed away at the age of 74 due to lung cancer.

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Molly Dodd

Molly Dodd (November 11, 1921 Los Angeles-March 26, 1981 Santa Monica) a.k.a. Mary E. Dodd, Mary Elise Dodd or Bea Chilson was an American actor.

Although she appeared in over 30 films and television series throughout her career, Molly Dodd is best known for her role as Auntie Em in the classic film "The Wizard of Oz" (1939). She began her acting career in the 1930s, playing small roles in films such as "Curly Top" (1935) and "Heidi" (1937). She also had a recurring role in the television series "Peyton Place" in the 1960s. In addition to her acting work, Dodd was an avid horseback rider and was involved in various equine-related organizations. She passed away in 1981 at the age of 59 due to cancer.

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Ruth Orkin

Ruth Orkin (September 3, 1921 Boston-January 16, 1985 New York City) was an American photographer, film editor, film director, screenwriter, film producer, filmmaker and actor. She had two children, Mary Engel and Andy Engel.

Orkin is best known for her photograph titled "American Girl in Italy," which was taken in Florence, Italy in 1951 and features a young woman walking down a street while being ogled by a group of men. The photograph has become a cultural icon and has been reproduced countless times in various forms of media. Orkin began her career as a photographer in the 1940s and went on to have a successful career in film as well, working on projects such as "Little Fugitive" and "Autobiography of a Princess." She was also known for her work as a feminist, advocating for women's rights and equality through her art. Orkin passed away in 1985 at the age of 63 due to cancer.

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Judy Holliday

Judy Holliday (June 21, 1921 New York City-June 7, 1965 New York City) a.k.a. Judith Tuvim was an American singer, actor, musician and comedian. She had one child, Jonathan Oppenheim.

Judy Holliday is best known for her work in film and theater during the 1940s and 1950s. She began her career as a nightclub performer and made her film debut in 1949 in "Adam's Rib" opposite Spencer Tracy and Katharine Hepburn. She went on to star in several other films, including "Born Yesterday" (for which she won an Academy Award for Best Actress), "The Marrying Kind" and "Bells Are Ringing."

In addition to her successes on screen, Holliday also had a successful career on Broadway. She starred in the original productions of "Born Yesterday" and "Bells Are Ringing," earning Tony Award nominations for both performances.

Holliday's career was cut short when she was diagnosed with breast cancer in 1960. She underwent a mastectomy and continued to work despite her illness. She died in 1965, at the age of 43.

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Reno Browne

Reno Browne (April 20, 1921 Reno-May 15, 1991 Reno) otherwise known as Reno Blair or Josephine Ruth Clarke was an American actor and pilot.

She is best known for her roles in Western films and television series, appearing alongside notable actors such as Roy Rogers and Gene Autry. Browne was also a licensed pilot and served in the Women Airforce Service Pilots during World War II. After her acting career, she became a successful businesswoman, running a successful real estate firm in Reno, Nevada.

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Cay Forrester

Cay Forrester (December 26, 1921 Stockton-June 18, 2005 Las Vegas) otherwise known as Mila Patricia Crosby, Cay Forester, Kate Archer or Kay Forrester was an American actor.

Forrester was best known for her work on stage and in television, with notable appearances in popular shows such as "The Twilight Zone," "Perry Mason" and "The Outer Limits." She was also a talented writer, credited with penning several screenplays and teleplays throughout her career. Forrester began her acting career in the 1950s and continued to work in the industry until her retirement in the early 1990s. She was married twice, first to actor Gregory Morton and later to fellow actor Richard Erdman. Forrester passed away from natural causes in Las Vegas at the age of 83.

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Patricia Wright

Patricia Wright (July 15, 1921 Spokane-) is an American actor.

Patricia Wright began her career in theater and then transitioned to television and film. She is best known for her roles in the television shows "Perry Mason" and "The Twilight Zone". Wright also appeared in several films, including "The Dark Intruder" and "The Satan Bug". In addition to her acting career, Wright was also a director and producer in the theater. She performed on Broadway in "The Curious Savage" and directed several plays, including "The Mousetrap" and "Bell, Book and Candle". Wright was awarded a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame in 1979.

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Justine Johnston

Justine Johnston (June 13, 1921 Evanston-January 13, 2006 West Hollywood) otherwise known as Justine Johnson or The Lady with the Hat was an American actor.

Born in Evanston, Illinois to a family of performers, Johnston began her career in show business in the 1940s as a stage actress in New York City. She later transitioned to film and television, appearing in a number of popular shows and movies throughout the 1950s and 60s.

Johnston was most recognized for her distinctive look, often wearing a large, ornate hat in public appearances and performances. However, she was also highly respected for her raw talent and skill as an actor. She received critical acclaim for her performance in the 1964 Off-Broadway play "Little Murders," and was nominated for a Tony Award for her role in the 1965 Broadway production of "The School for Scandal."

In addition to her work on stage and screen, Johnston was also known for her tireless activism on behalf of social and political causes. She was a vocal advocate for civil rights, women's rights, and LGBTQ+ rights, and was involved in numerous grassroots organizations throughout her life.

Despite suffering from multiple sclerosis in her later years, Johnston continued to act and perform, and was even featured in the 2005 documentary film "Grey Gardens." She passed away in 2006 at the age of 84, leaving behind a legacy as a trailblazing performer and activist.

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Joan Tetzel

Joan Tetzel (June 21, 1921 New York City-October 31, 1977 Fairwarp) also known as Joan Margaret Tetzel was an American actor.

She was born into a family of actors and started her career in the theatre. She appeared in several Broadway productions, including "The Very Naked Boy", "P.S. I Love You", and "Goodbye, My Fancy". In the 1940s, she moved into film, and appeared on-screen in films such as "Dial M for Murder" and "The File on Thelma Jordon". Tetzel also acted in numerous television shows in the 1950s and 60s including "The Twilight Zone", "The FBI", and "Perry Mason". She was married to writer and producer Jerrold Freedman and had two children. Later in life, Tetzel suffered from depression and committed suicide in her home in England.

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Virginia Belmont

Virginia Belmont (September 20, 1921 Boston-May 6, 2014 Hollywood) also known as Virginia Belmonte was an American actor.

She began her career in the entertainment industry as a dancer and later transitioned to acting. Virginia appeared in many television shows and films throughout her career including "The Cisco Kid" (1950-1956), "The Big Heat" (1953), and "The Girl in Black Stockings" (1957). She was also a regular performer on variety shows such as "The Colgate Comedy Hour" and "The Ed Sullivan Show". In addition to her acting career, Virginia was a talented artist and worked as an illustrator for publications such as Look magazine. She passed away in 2014 at the age of 92.

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Chevi Colton

Chevi Colton (December 21, 1921 New York City-) is an American actor. She has two children, Christopher Silver and Jennifer Silver.

Chevi Colton began her career in show business as a radio actress during the 1940s, appearing on popular programs such as "This Is Your FBI" and "The Adventures of Ozzie and Harriet". She later transitioned into television and film, appearing in movies like "Jeanne Eagels" and "The Great American Pastime". In addition to her acting career, Colton was also a writer and published several children's books. She was married to fellow actor and director William Prince until his death in 1996. Colton has also worked extensively in the theater, appearing in productions of "The Glass Menagerie" and "Come Back, Little Sheba" on Broadway.

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Jean Carlin

Jean Carlin (September 2, 1921 Long Beach-October 23, 1998 Los Angeles) was an American actor.

He started his career in the 1940s and appeared in several Broadway productions before transitioning to films and television. Carlin is perhaps best known for his roles in the classic TV series "The Twilight Zone" and "The Andy Griffith Show". He also had notable appearances in films such as "The Boy with Green Hair" and "Tarzan and the She-Devil". Carlin continued to work in Hollywood throughout the 1980s, appearing in several television shows such as "The A-Team" and "Knots Landing". In addition to his acting career, he also served in the United States Army during World War II.

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Acquanetta

Acquanetta (July 17, 1921 Cheyenne-August 16, 2004 Ahwatukee, Phoenix) also known as Burnu Acquanetta, The Venezuelan Volcano, Mildred Davenport or Burunu Davenport was an American actor. She had four children, Jack Ross Jr., Lance Ross, tom Ross and Rex Ross.

Acquanetta was born to a family of Arapaho Native American and Afro-Caribbean descent. She grew up in a strict Catholic boarding school in Pennsylvania and later moved to New York City to pursue a career in modeling. Her unique and exotic look caught the attention of Hollywood talent scouts, and she soon landed roles in films such as "Tarzan and the Leopard Woman" and "Captivity."

Despite her success on the silver screen, Acquanetta faced racism and discrimination in Hollywood due to her mixed heritage. She eventually retired from acting in the 1950s and settled in Arizona, where she became an artist and a writer. She also worked as a nurse and devoted her time to various charitable organizations.

Acquanetta's legacy continues to inspire many, particularly those who have faced similar struggles in the entertainment industry. In 2012, she was posthumously inducted into the Native American Women's Hall of Fame.

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Jeff Donnell

Jeff Donnell (July 10, 1921 Windham-April 11, 1988 Los Angeles) also known as Jean Marie Donnell, Miss Jeff Donnell, Jeff or Jean Donnell was an American actor. She had two children, Sarah Jane and Michael Pineas.

Donnell began her career in the early 1940s, appearing in small roles in a number of films. She was most often cast as the leading lady's wisecracking friend in films such as "My Favorite Blonde" and "The Incredible Mr. Limpet". She also appeared in television shows such as "General Electric Theater" and "The Twilight Zone". In addition to her acting career, Donnell was also an active member of the Screen Actors Guild, serving as its vice president for several years. She passed away in 1988 at the age of 66 due to heart failure.

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Elizabeth Wilson

Elizabeth Wilson (April 4, 1921 Grand Rapids-) a.k.a. Elizabeth Welter Wilson or Elizabeth W. Wilson is an American actor.

She began her career in theater, performing both on and off Broadway, and won a Tony Award in 1972 for her performance in the play "Sticks and Bones." She also appeared in numerous films and television shows, including "The Graduate," "9 to 5," and "The Addams Family." Wilson was known for her exceptional range as an actress, playing roles that ranged from comedic to dramatic. She passed away in 2015 at the age of 94, but her legacy in theater and film continues to inspire and influence aspiring actors today.

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Lucille Norman

Lucille Norman (June 15, 1921 Lincoln-April 1, 1998 Glendale) a.k.a. Lucille Pharaby Boileau was an American actor and singer.

Norman began her career as a radio singer in the 1940s and later transitioned to television and film. She appeared in numerous television shows and movies throughout the 1950s and 1960s, including roles in "The Lone Ranger," "Gunsmoke," and "Perry Mason." Norman was also an accomplished singer, performing on shows such as "The Ed Sullivan Show" and "The Dinah Shore Show." In addition to her work in entertainment, Norman was an active member of her community, volunteering her time and efforts to various causes, including the American Cancer Society and the Red Cross. She passed away in 1998 at the age of 76.

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Catherine McLeod

Catherine McLeod (July 2, 1921 Santa Monica-May 11, 1997 Sherman Oaks) also known as Catherine Mc Leod, Catherine McCleod, Catharine McLeod or Catherine Frances McLeod was an American actor. She had three children, John Keefer, Tom Keefer and Don Keefer Jr..

Catherine McLeod was born in Santa Monica, California in 1921 to a family of actors. Her parents were character actors Monte and Miriam McLeod, and her older sister was actor Margaret McLeod. Catherine made her film debut in "Avalon" in 1940, and went on to have a successful career in both film and television. She was known for her roles in films such as "Love and Learn" (1947), "Fury at Showdown" (1957), and "Rich Man, Poor Man" (1976). In addition to her acting career, McLeod was also a skilled equestrian and competed in horse shows. She continued to act into the 1980s, and passed away in Sherman Oaks in 1997 at the age of 75.

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Jackie Stallone

Jackie Stallone (November 29, 1921 Washington, D.C.-) a.k.a. Jacqueline Labofish, Jacqueline M. "Jackie" Stallone, Mama Stallone, Jacqueline Stallone, Jacqueline M. Labofish, Jacqueline M. Stallone, Jackie or Jacqueline "Jackie" Stallone is an American astrologer, actor, promoter and dancer. She has three children, Sylvester Stallone, Frank Stallone and Toni D'Alto.

Jackie Stallone was born in Washington D.C. and grew up in a middle-class family. After completing her education, she moved to New York City to pursue a career in dance. Jackie became a highly sought-after dancer and choreographer, working with stars like Bob Fosse and Jerome Robbins.

In the 1970s, Jackie became interested in astrology and began studying the subject. She soon became a well-known astrologer and began writing horoscopes for newspapers and magazines. She also authored several books on the subject.

Jackie is perhaps best known for her appearances on reality TV shows such as "Celebrity Big Brother" and "Surreal Life." She has also acted in films such as "GLOW: Gorgeous Ladies of Wrestling" and "The Appointment."

Outside of her entertainment career, Jackie has been involved in charity work and has supported organizations such as the American Heart Association and the National Stroke Association. She continues to practice astrology and dance in her free time.

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Martha Greenhouse

Martha Greenhouse (June 14, 1921 Omaha-January 5, 2013 Manhattan) otherwise known as Martha Miriam Greenhouse was an American actor.

She appeared in many television shows, movies, and plays throughout her career, earning critical acclaim for her performances. Greenhouse received a Tony Award nomination for Best Featured Actress in a Play for her role in the play "The Tenth Man" in 1959. She also appeared in movies such as "The Producers" (1967) and "Three Days of the Condor" (1975). In addition to her acting work, Greenhouse was an advocate for the arts and served on the board of directors for the Theatre Development Fund. She passed away at the age of 91 in 2013 in Manhattan.

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Dorothy Shay

Dorothy Shay (April 21, 1921 Jacksonville-October 22, 1978 Santa Monica) also known as Shay, Dorothy or Dorothy Sims was an American singer and actor.

Dorothy Shay gained popularity during the 1940s and 1950s for her comedic and sometimes risque songs. She often used a Southern accent and poked fun at stereotypes. She was affectionately nicknamed the "Park Avenue Hillbilly". Shay recorded numerous hits including "Feudin' and Fightin'", "Mountain Gal", and "Bedroom Blues". She also made appearances on television programs such as "The Ed Sullivan Show" and "The Milton Berle Show". After retiring from the entertainment industry, Shay moved to Santa Monica, California where she lived until her death.

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Janet Blair

Janet Blair (April 23, 1921 Altoona-February 19, 2007 Santa Monica) a.k.a. Martha Jean Lafferty, Blair, Janet, janet_blair, Martha Jane Lafferty or Martha Janet Lafferty was an American singer and actor. Her children are called Andrew Mayo and Amanda Mayo.

Blair started her career as a singer before transitioning to acting in the 1940s. She gained popularity for her performances in musical films such as "Broadway Serenade" (1939) and "My Sister Eileen" (1942). She also appeared in several dramatic films including "The Fabulous Dorseys" (1947) and "Public Pigeon No. 1" (1957). Blair also had a successful television career, starring in the series "The Smith Family" (1971-1972) and "The Love Boat" (1985).

Blair's personal life was marked by tragedy, as she was widowed twice. Her first husband, aspiring actor Louis Ferdinand Busch, died during World War II, while her second husband, producer Nick Mayo, died in a car accident in 1965. Blair was also diagnosed with cancer in the 1980s but was able to beat the disease after undergoing treatment. She remained active in the entertainment industry until the 1990s, when she retired to focus on her family.

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Katharine Balfour

Katharine Balfour (February 7, 1921 New York City-April 3, 1990 New York City) a.k.a. Katherine Balfour was an American actor.

She began her career in theater, performing in various productions in New York City. Balfour eventually transitioned to film and television, appearing in several popular TV shows and movies throughout the 1950s and 1960s. Some of her notable roles include appearances in "The Twilight Zone," "The Fugitive," and "Perry Mason." She also had a successful Broadway career, starring in productions of "The Heiress" and "The Tower Beyond Tragedy." Balfour was known for her dynamic range and ability to capture complex characters on stage and screen, earning critical acclaim and admiration from her peers in the industry. She passed away in 1990 at the age of 69 due to complications from pneumonia.

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Doris Houck

Doris Houck (September 28, 1921 Wallace-December 14, 1965 Santa Monica) a.k.a. Doris Colleen or Doris Colleen Houck was an American actor.

She is best known for her appearances in classic Hollywood movies such as "The Three Musketeers" (1948), "The Pirate" (1948), and "The Secret Life of Walter Mitty" (1947). Born in Wallace, Idaho, Doris began her acting career in the late 1940s and quickly became a popular face on the big screen. Throughout her career, she appeared in over 25 films and starred alongside actors such as Gene Kelly, Margaret O'Brien, and Danny Kaye. Doris was known for her charming personality and natural acting abilities, which helped to make her a beloved figure in Hollywood. Despite her success, she passed away at a young age of 44, leaving behind a legacy that has endured to this day.

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Gale Robbins

Gale Robbins (May 7, 1921 Chicago-February 18, 1980 Tarzana) also known as Betty Gale Robbins or Gail Robbins was an American actor, singer and model.

She began her career as a model before transitioning to acting and singing. Robbins appeared in several Hollywood films during the 1940s and 1950s, including "Bells Are Ringing" and "The Barkleys of Broadway." She also starred in numerous stage productions such as "Pal Joey" and "Gentlemen Prefer Blondes." Despite her success in entertainment, Robbins is perhaps best known for her work as a philanthropist. She was active in several charities and was a beloved figure in many communities. Robbins passed away at the age of 58.

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Betty Jaynes

Betty Jaynes (February 12, 1921 Greeneville-) a.k.a. Betty Jayne Schultz is an American actor.

She began her career in the 1940s and appeared in several films and TV shows throughout the decades. Some of her notable roles include playing Peggy in the 1943 film "Girl Crazy" and playing Ellen in the 1953 film "The Big Heat." In addition to acting, Jaynes was also a prolific voice actor and provided voices for several animated TV series, including "The Bugs Bunny Show" and "Top Cat." Later in her career, she also worked as a casting director for various film and TV productions. Jaynes retired from show business in the early 1980s.

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Shirl Bernheim

Shirl Bernheim (September 21, 1921 Manhattan-March 30, 2009 Englewood) also known as Shirley Raphael or Shirley Bernheim was an American actor.

She was born and raised in New York City and began her career in the theater, performing in various productions on and off Broadway. She also appeared in several films and television shows throughout her career, including "Law & Order," "Cheers," and "The Equalizer." In addition to her acting work, Bernheim was a talented painter and sculptor, and her artwork was displayed in several exhibitions. She passed away in 2009 at the age of 87.

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