American movie stars died in 1979

Here are 45 famous actresses from United States of America died in 1979:

Marjorie Daw

Marjorie Daw (January 19, 1902 Colorado Springs-March 18, 1979 Huntington Beach) a.k.a. Margaret House, Margery Daw, Marguerite House or The Girl with the Nursery Rhyme Name was an American actor.

She began her acting career in the 1920s as a chorus girl in New York City before transitioning to film. Daw appeared in over 50 films throughout her career, including notable roles in "The Crash" (1932) and "The Death Kiss" (1932). In the latter film, she played the lead and was praised for her performance. Despite her success, Daw retired from acting in 1934 to focus on her family. She later moved to California where she worked as a real estate agent until her death in 1979.

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Celia Adler

Celia Adler (December 6, 1889 New York City-January 31, 1979 The Bronx) otherwise known as Celia Feinman Adler or First Lady of the Yiddish Theatre was an American actor.

Born to a family of Yiddish actors, Adler began performing on stage at a young age. She became a prominent member of the Yiddish theatre scene in New York City and was known for her powerful performances in both dramatic and comedic roles. In the 1930s, Adler began transitioning to the English-speaking stage and appeared in a number of Broadway productions, including "A Flag is Born" and "Jacobowsky and the Colonel". She was also known for her work in film, appearing in movies such as "The House of Rothschild" and "Dressed to Kill". Throughout her career, Adler was highly respected for her dedication to the craft of acting and her contributions to the Yiddish theatre.

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Eleanor Robson Belmont

Eleanor Robson Belmont (December 13, 1879 Wigan-October 24, 1979 Manhattan) was an American actor.

Born as Eleanor Robson, she was the daughter of a successful English actor and theatrical manager. She started acting at the young age of 13 and became a sensation in the theatrical world within a few years. She appeared in several successful Broadway productions and gained critical acclaim for her performances. In 1902, she met and married August Belmont Jr., a prominent banker and sportsman. Following her marriage, she retired from acting and became a well-known socialite, known for her lavish parties and philanthropic work. She was actively involved in various charities and social causes, including the Women's Suffrage Movement in the US. She also managed her husband's Thoroughbred racing stable and was the first female member of The Jockey Club. After her husband's death in 1924, she continued to be an active philanthropist and worked towards the betterment of underprivileged children through various charitable organizations. She lived a long and fruitful life and passed away at the age of 99 in Manhattan.

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Karen Ciral

Karen Ciral (March 23, 1945 Riverside County-July 27, 1979 Los Angeles) was an American actor.

She is best known for her role as Lola in the film "Vanishing Point" (1971) and as Doreen in "The Swinging Cheerleaders" (1974). Ciral began her career in the late 1960s, appearing in several television shows such as "The Mod Squad" and "The F.B.I." before transitioning into film. Apart from her acting work, Ciral was also a successful model in the 1960s, working under the name Karen Scott. She tragically died at the young age of 34 due to complications from diabetes.

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Eva Puck

Eva Puck (November 27, 1892 New York City-October 24, 1979 Los Angeles) was an American actor and singer.

She began her career as a child performer in vaudeville and later transitioned to Broadway musicals, appearing in shows such as "Irene" and "The Gingham Girl." Puck eventually made the move to Hollywood and appeared in several films throughout the 1930s and 1940s, often playing comedic and character roles. She also continued to sing both in films and on radio broadcasts. In addition to her work in entertainment, Puck was also an active member of several charitable organizations, including the California Crippled Children's Society.

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Shirley Mason

Shirley Mason (June 6, 1900 Brooklyn-July 27, 1979 Los Angeles) also known as Leonie Flugrath was an American actor.

She began her career on Broadway before transitioning to film in the 1920s. Mason was a versatile actress known for her dramatic and comedic roles. One of her most memorable performances was in the 1931 film "Mad Love" where she portrayed a woman whose hands were transplanted with those of a murderer. Mason continued acting well into the 1950s and also worked in radio and television. However, despite her successful career, she battled with mental health issues and was diagnosed with multiple personality disorder. Her struggles with mental illness inspired the book and subsequent film "The Three Faces of Eve".

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Dorothy Peterson

Dorothy Peterson (December 25, 1897 Hector-October 3, 1979 New York City) also known as Bergetta Peterson was an American actor. Her children are called Margaret Peterson and Andrew Peterson.

Dorothy Peterson began her acting career in the 1930s and appeared in over 80 films throughout her career. Some of her notable film credits include "The Devil and Daniel Webster" (1941), "Saboteur" (1942), and "The North Star" (1943). She also acted in a number of television shows, including "The Twilight Zone" and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents".

In addition to her acting work, Peterson was actively involved in the Actors' Equity Association, serving on the executive committee and participating in various committees throughout her career. She was also a founding member of the Stage Women's War Relief, an organization that raised money and support for women in the entertainment industry during World War II.

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Laurie Bird

Laurie Bird (September 26, 1953 Long Island-June 15, 1979 New York City) also known as Lauri Bird was an American photographer and actor.

Bird was born and raised on Long Island, New York. She began her career as a model before transitioning into photography, where she captured portraits of actors and musicians. Bird's work as a photographer caught the attention of director Monte Hellman, who cast her in her first film role in "Two-Lane Blacktop" (1971). She went on to appear in two more of Hellman's films, "Cockfighter" (1974) and "The Shooting" (1966).

Bird also appeared in a number of other films, including "Annie Hall" (1977), "Tryin' to Sleep in the Bed You Made" (1981), and "Eat My Dust" (1976). However, she is perhaps best known for her relationship with musician Art Garfunkel. The two met on the set of "Bad Timing" (1980) and dated until Bird's untimely death in 1979 at the age of 25. Bird's death was ruled a suicide.

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Ethel Remey

Ethel Remey (February 22, 1895 New York City-February 28, 1979 Neptune Township) was an American actor.

In addition to acting, Ethel Remey was also a writer and painter. She studied at the Brooklyn Academy of Design and the Art Students League of New York. Her acting career began in the 1920s and she appeared in both films and stage productions throughout her career. Some of her notable film roles include appearances in "The Painted Desert" (1931) and "The Moonstone" (1934). She was also a published author, writing a memoir titled "The Third Mrs. Cartwright" in 1968. Remey was married to the architect and author, Charles Gilman Remey, and they had three children together.

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Donyale Luna

Donyale Luna (August 31, 1945 Detroit-May 17, 1979 Rome) also known as Peggy Anne Freeman, Peggy Anne Donyale Aragonea Pegeon Freeman or Luna was an American actor and model. She had one child, Dream Cazzaniga.

Donyale Luna was one of the first African-American models to gain global recognition. She began her career as a model in the mid-1960s and quickly became a sensation, appearing on the covers of major fashion magazines such as Harper's Bazaar and Vogue. In 1966, she made history as the first black model to appear on the cover of British Vogue.

Luna's acting career began in 1968, when she appeared in the film Skidoo. She went on to star in several other films, including the psychedelic classic, The Trip. Her unique look and captivating presence made her a favorite of avant-garde filmmakers and artists.

Despite her success, Luna struggled with drug addiction and had a tumultuous personal life. She moved to Europe in the early 1970s and continued to work as a model and actress. She died tragically in Rome in 1979 at the age of 33 from an overdose of heroin. Luna's legacy as a trailblazing model and actress continues to inspire and influence generations of artists and performers.

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Mary Pickford

Mary Pickford (April 8, 1892 Toronto-May 29, 1979 Santa Monica) also known as Gladys Louise Smith, Gladys Marie Smith, Little Mary, "The Girl with the Golden Hair", America's Sweetheart, Baby Gladys, "The Glad Girl", Gladys Smith, Baby Gladys Smith, Dorothy Nicholson, Gladys Nicholson, The girl with the curls, The World's Sweetheart, Pickford or Gladys Moore was an American actor, film producer, writer and screenwriter. She had two children, Ronald Charles Rogers and Roxanne Rogers.

Pickford was one of the most popular and influential actors of the silent film era, and was a co-founder of the film studio United Artists. She was known for her expressive acting style and "natural" performances, often playing young, innocent characters. Pickford also played an important role in the development of the film industry, pioneering new techniques in acting and production, and helping to establish Hollywood as the center of the US film industry. In addition to acting and producing, she wrote several books and was a significant philanthropist, supporting causes such as the Motion Picture Relief Fund and the March of Dimes. In recognition of her contributions to the film industry, Pickford received numerous awards and honors, including an Academy Award for Best Actress in 1929.

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Merle Oberon

Merle Oberon (February 19, 1911 Mumbai-November 23, 1979 Malibu) a.k.a. Estelle Merle O'Brien Thompson, Estelle Merle Thompson, Obie, Queenie O'Brien, Queenie Thompson, Queenie, Estelle "Queenie" Thompson, "Queenie Thompson", "Obie", Princess Merle, Lady Korda, Estelle Merle Oberon or Istel Merle O 'Brian Thompson was an American actor and film producer. Her children are called Bruno Pagliai Jr. and Francesca Pagliai.

Merle Oberon was actually born in Mumbai, India, to an Anglo-Indian mother and a father believed to be of Indian or Sri Lankan descent. She started her career in British films before moving to Hollywood and becoming a major star in the 1930s and 1940s. Some of her notable films include The Private Life of Henry VIII, Wuthering Heights, and The Dark Angel. Oberon was known for her exotic beauty and received an Academy Award nomination for her role in The Dark Angel. She was married four times, including once to famed director Alexander Korda. In addition to acting, Oberon also produced several films and was actively involved in charity work. Despite her success, Oberon faced discrimination and prejudice in Hollywood because of her ethnic background and often had to hide or deny her Indian heritage.

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Sally Rand

Sally Rand (April 3, 1904 Elkton-August 31, 1979 Glendora) also known as Helen Gould Beck or Billie Beck was an American exotic dancer, actor and dancer.

She was born in Elkton, Missouri and began her career in entertainment as a chorus girl in Hollywood. She gained fame for her performances at the 1933 Chicago World's Fair, where she introduced the famous "fan dance". She continued to perform the fan dance throughout her career, becoming known for her glamorous, romantic style.

In addition to her dance career, Rand appeared in several films, including "Alice in Wonderland" (1933) and "Sunset Boulevard" (1950). She also performed on Broadway and in vaudeville, earning a reputation as a talented and versatile entertainer.

Despite her success, Rand faced frequent criticism and controversy for her provocative performances, which some considered indecent. She defended herself, however, arguing that her dance was an art form and that she was simply expressing herself creatively.

In later years, Rand became an advocate for animal rights, founding the Sally Rand Foundation to provide educational resources about animal welfare. She passed away in Glendora, California in 1979 at the age of 75.

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Darla Hood

Darla Hood (November 8, 1931 Leedey-June 13, 1979 North Hollywood) also known as darla_hood, Darla Jean Hood or Darla Hood Granson was an American actor, child actor and singer.

She is best known for her role as the leading lady in the Our Gang comedy series from 1935 to 1941. Hood also appeared in several Hollywood films, including "Little Rascals" and "Babes in Toyland." In the 1950s, she transitioned to a career in music and recorded several singles and albums. Hood continued to perform and make appearances at various events until her death in 1979 at the age of 47. Despite her relatively short career, she remains an iconic figure in American pop culture, especially among fans of classic comedy and music.

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Ann Dvorak

Ann Dvorak (August 2, 1911 New York City-December 10, 1979 Honolulu) also known as Anna McKim, Baby Anna Lehr, Ann McKim, Anna Lehr or Anna May McKim was an American actor.

She began her career in Hollywood during the silent era and was featured in several early talkies, but it was her role in the 1932 film "Scarface" opposite Paul Muni that launched her to stardom. Throughout her career, she appeared in over 60 films and worked with some of the biggest names in the industry, including James Cagney, Humphrey Bogart, and Joan Crawford. She was also known for her support of liberal causes and her involvement in the Hollywood Anti-Nazi League. After retiring from acting in the 1950s, she pursued a career in psychology and became a licensed therapist in Hawaii. Dvorak passed away at the age of 68 from colon cancer.

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Cornelia Otis Skinner

Cornelia Otis Skinner (May 30, 1899 Chicago-July 9, 1979 New York City) also known as Cornelia Skinner was an American screenwriter, actor and author.

She was born to actor Otis Skinner and his wife Maud Durbin Watson. Cornelia Skinner began her acting career in 1921 in the theatre production of "Blood and Sand". She then went on to perform in many plays and Broadway productions throughout her career.

In addition to her acting, Skinner was also a successful writer, publishing several books throughout her lifetime. Her most notable works include "Our Hearts Were Young and Gay" and "Elegant Wits and Grand Horizontals".

Skinner was married twice, her first to Alden Sanford Blodget in 1931, which ended in divorce in 1944. She later married Eliot Daniel, a composer, in 1944, and they remained married until her death.

Cornelia Skinner is also recognized for her humanitarian work, particularly her involvement in the Civil Rights Movement. She was an advocate for equality and worked towards justice and freedom for African Americans.

Skinner passed away on July 9, 1979, in New York City.

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Claudia Jennings

Claudia Jennings (December 20, 1949 Saint Paul-October 3, 1979 California State Route 1) also known as Mary Eileen Chesterton, Mary Eileen "Mimi" Chesterton or Mimi was an American nude glamour model and actor.

She first gained fame as Playboy magazine's November 1969 Playmate of the Month and later went on to appear in numerous films throughout the 1970s, including "Truck Stop Women," "Gator Bait," and "The Great Texas Dynamite Chase." Jennings was known for her natural beauty and talent as an actress, which helped her break free from the stereotype of being just another pretty face. Tragically, she passed away at the age of 29 in a car accident on California State Route 1. Despite her short life and career, Jennings remains a beloved cultural icon and is remembered for her contributions to the entertainment industry.

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Mabel Taliaferro

Mabel Taliaferro (May 21, 1887 New York City-January 24, 1979 Honolulu) also known as Maybelle Evelyn Taliaferro, The Sweetheart of American Movies, Mabel "Nell" Taliaferro or Nell was an American actor.

She appeared in over 200 films, most notably in the silent film era. Taliaferro got her start in the theater before transitioning to film, landing a contract with Biograph Studios in 1909. She often portrayed the innocent and charming love interest in her films, earning her the nickname "The Sweetheart of American Movies". Taliaferro also worked as a screenwriter and director. She retired from acting in the late 1920s and went on to pursue a career as a writer and journalist. In 1979, she passed away in Honolulu where she had been living for many years.

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Belle Mitchell

Belle Mitchell (September 24, 1889 Croswell-February 12, 1979 Woodland Hills) was an American actor.

Belle Mitchell began her career as a stage actress before transitioning to the screen in the 1910s. She appeared in over 140 films in her career, often playing mothers or grandmothers. Some of her notable film credits include "The Crowd" (1928), "The Big Parade" (1925), and "The Great Ziegfeld" (1936). Mitchell was also a prolific radio actress, appearing on shows such as "Dr. Christian" and "Lux Radio Theatre". She was known for her warm and motherly demeanor onscreen and had a successful career in both silent and sound films. Mitchell retired from acting in the early 1950s and lived the rest of her life in Woodland Hills, California.

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Carol Holloway

Carol Holloway (April 30, 1892 Williamstown-January 3, 1979 California) a.k.a. Carol Halloway or Carol Hollaway was an American actor and writer.

She is best known for her work as a writer for films such as The Love Bug, The Parent Trap, and That Darn Cat!. Holloway also acted in a number of films in the 1940s and 1950s, including The Egg and I and Ma and Pa Kettle.

Born in Williamstown, Massachusetts, Holloway began her career in Hollywood as a screenwriter in the 1930s. She quickly gained a reputation as a talented writer, and her scripts were in high demand throughout the industry. In addition to her work on films, Holloway also wrote for television, including episodes of Gunsmoke and Perry Mason.

Despite her success as a writer, Holloway also pursued a career as an actress. She appeared on Broadway in the 1920s, and later transitioned to film. While she never achieved the same level of success as an actress that she did as a writer, Holloway was respected for her work and regarded as a talented performer.

Holloway passed away in California in 1979 at the age of 86. Today, she is remembered as a pioneering figure in the entertainment industry, and her work continues to inspire and entertain audiences around the world.

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Charlotte Mineau

Charlotte Mineau (March 24, 1886 Michigan-October 12, 1979 Los Angeles) a.k.a. Charlotte Meno was an American actor.

She began her career in entertainment as a vaudeville performer, and eventually transitioned to acting in films in the silent era. Mineau appeared in over 200 films throughout her career, often playing supporting roles and bit parts. She worked with well-known directors such as Cecil B. DeMille and Frank Capra. Mineau was known for her versatility as an actor, portraying a range of characters from comedic to dramatic roles. She continued to act into the 1960s, making appearances on popular television shows such as "The Beverly Hillbillies" and "Perry Mason". In addition to her acting work, Mineau was also a member of the Motion Picture Mothers, an organization that provided support to women in the film industry.

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Jean Seberg

Jean Seberg (November 13, 1938 Marshalltown-August 30, 1979 Paris) also known as Jean Dorothy Seberg was an American actor. She had two children, Alexandre Diego Gary and Nina Hart Gary.

Seberg rose to fame with her starring role in the iconic film "Breathless" (1960), directed by Jean-Luc Godard. She quickly became a fashion icon and appeared in numerous films such as "Lilith" (1964), "Moment to Moment" (1965), and "Airport" (1970).

In addition to her acting career, Seberg was also a political activist and outspoken supporter of various civil rights causes. She was involved in the Black Panther Party and was later targeted by the FBI's COINTELPRO program, leading to intense surveillance and harassment that greatly impacted her mental health.

Tragically, Seberg died by suicide at the age of 40 in Paris, where she was living at the time. Her legacy as a brave and talented performer, as well as her activism and persecution by the government, continue to be remembered and celebrated today.

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Theresa Ferrara

Theresa Ferrara (November 27, 2014 Five Towns-May 18, 1979) was an American informant, model, actor and entrepreneur.

She was also known as "Terry the Jeweler" due to her successful career as a jewelry designer. Ferrara grew up in Five Towns, Long Island, and began her career as a model in New York City in the 1950s. She later turned to acting and appeared in several films and television shows including "The Godfather" and "Kojak."

Ferrara became involved in the world of organized crime and acted as an informant for the FBI in the late 1960s, providing information on the workings of the Mafia. Despite this danger, she continued her work as a jewelry designer and her pieces were popular among celebrities and socialites.

Ferrara died in 1979 in a car accident at the age of 64, leaving behind a legacy as both a successful entrepreneur and a key player in the fight against organized crime.

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Vivian Vance

Vivian Vance (July 26, 1909 Cherryvale-August 17, 1979 Belvedere) otherwise known as Vivian Roberta Jones, vivian_vance or Viv was an American singer and actor.

Vivian Vance was best known for her portrayal of Ethel Mertz on the television sitcom I Love Lucy alongside Lucille Ball. Vance won an Emmy Award for her role in 1954. She then went on to reprise the role of Ethel in the spin-off series The Lucy-Desi Comedy Hour, The Lucy Show, and Here's Lucy. Before her acting career, Vance had performed in Broadway musicals and had a successful career in radio. She also had a supporting role in the film The Great Race alongside Jack Lemmon and Tony Curtis. Vance was married four times, and had two children. In addition to her acting career, she was an avid supporter of the arts and a philanthropist, supporting numerous causes throughout her life.

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Minerva Pious

Minerva Pious (March 5, 1903 Odessa-March 16, 1979 New York City) was an American actor.

She was best known for her role as Mrs. Podhajsky in the 1971 film "The Great White Hope", for which she received critical acclaim. Pious was born in Ukraine and immigrated to the United States with her family when she was a child. She began her acting career in the Yiddish theater in the 1920s and later transitioned to English-language productions on both stage and screen. Pious appeared in several films and television shows throughout her career, including "The Odd Couple", "Kojak", and "Rhoda". She was known for her strong character portrayals and her ability to play a range of roles, from comedic to dramatic. Pious passed away in 1979 at the age of 76.

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Joan Blondell

Joan Blondell (August 30, 1906 New York City-December 25, 1979 Santa Monica) also known as Rose Joan Blondell or Rosebud Blondell was an American actor, singer, fashion model and author. She had two children, Norman Powell and Ellen Powell.

Blondell began her career in vaudeville and made her way to Broadway in the 1920s. She then transitioned into film in the 1930s, working with top stars such as James Cagney and Humphrey Bogart. She earned an Academy Award nomination for Best Supporting Actress for her role in "The Blue Veil" in 1951. Along with her successful acting career, Blondell was also a talented singer and appeared in several musicals throughout her career. She wrote an autobiography titled "Center Door Fancy" in 1972, which detailed her life in Hollywood, her marriages, and her struggles with alcoholism. Blondell passed away from leukemia at the age of 73.

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Barbara Luddy

Barbara Luddy (May 25, 1908 Great Falls-April 1, 1979 Los Angeles) was an American actor.

She began her career in Hollywood in the 1930s, and went on to appear in over 100 films and television shows over the course of her career. Luddy is perhaps best known for her work as a voice actor, providing the voice of several memorable characters in a number of classic Disney films. She voiced Lady in "Lady and the Tramp", Kanga in "Winnie the Pooh", Merryweather in "Sleeping Beauty", and many others. Luddy was widely respected in the industry for her versatile talent and her ability to bring life to a variety of different characters. She passed away in 1979 at the age of 70, leaving behind a remarkable legacy in Hollywood.

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Virginia Brissac

Virginia Brissac (June 11, 1883 San Jose-July 26, 1979 Santa Fe) a.k.a. Virginia Alice Brisac was an American actor and businessperson. She had one child, Ardel Wray.

Virginia Brissac began her acting career in the 1930s, appearing in a number of films such as "Dark Victory" and "Gone with the Wind". She was also a regular performer on radio shows during the 1940s and 1950s, including "The Adventures of Sherlock Holmes" and "Dragnet". Brissac was a shrewd businesswoman as well, and she co-owned a successful chain of gas stations in Southern California. In addition to her work in entertainment and business, Brissac was also an accomplished artist, working with a variety of mediums including oil, watercolor, and charcoal. She lived a long and productive life, and continued to pursue her passions even into her later years.

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Doris Kenyon

Doris Kenyon (September 5, 1897 Syracuse-September 1, 1979 Beverly Hills) a.k.a. Doris Margaret Kenyon was an American actor. She had one child, Kenyon Clarence Sills.

Kenyon began her acting career in silent films, and made the transition to talkies, appearing in over 70 films throughout her career. She was known for her stunning beauty and her ability to portray strong and resilient female characters. Kenyon was a favorite of director Cecil B. DeMille and appeared in several of his films. She was also one of the founding members of the Screen Actors Guild. In addition to her acting career, Kenyon was also an accomplished artist and writer. She wrote several books and illustrated children's stories. In later years, she became involved in philanthropic work, particularly with organizations that focused on the welfare of animals.

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Isabelle Keith

Isabelle Keith (May 27, 1898 New York-July 20, 1979 Mill Valley) also known as Claudelle Kaye, Elizabeth Keith, Isabelle Keep, Isobel Keep, Elizabeth Keep or Keith was an American actor.

She began her career as a stage actress, performing in several Broadway productions during the 1920s and 1930s. Keith made her film debut in 1937, and went on to appear in over 50 films throughout her career. Some of her notable roles include Mrs. Godfrey in "The Thin Man Goes Home" (1945), Mrs. Day in "My Foolish Heart" (1949), and Mrs. Mardick in "The Big Knife" (1955).

Keith was also a regular presence on television, appearing in popular shows such as "The Twilight Zone," "Perry Mason," and "Gunsmoke." In addition to her acting career, she was an active member of the Screen Actors Guild and served on its board of directors.

Despite her success in Hollywood, Keith was known for keeping a low profile and maintaining her privacy. She retired from acting in the mid-1960s and spent her remaining years in Mill Valley, where she passed away in 1979.

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Erin O'Brien-Moore

Erin O'Brien-Moore (May 2, 1902 Los Angeles-May 3, 1979 Los Angeles) otherwise known as Erin O'Brien Moore was an American actor.

Erin O'Brien-Moore was best known for her roles in horror films during the 1930s and 40s, such as "Dracula's Daughter" and "The Bat". She also appeared in several notable films, including "Gone with the Wind" and "The Hunchback of Notre Dame". O'Brien-Moore started her acting career on stage before transitioning to film. She was married to actor and director Philip Rapp, and they had one child together. In addition to her acting career, O'Brien-Moore was also a writer and producer. She wrote several plays and produced "Starlight", a series of outdoor theatrical productions in Los Angeles during the 1940s. O'Brien-Moore passed away in 1979 at the age of 77.

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Celia Lovsky

Celia Lovsky (February 21, 1897 Vienna-October 12, 1979 Los Angeles) a.k.a. Caecilie Lvovsky or C├Ącilie Lvovsky was an American actor.

Lovsky began her acting career on stage in Vienna and Berlin, where she appeared in productions of classical plays. She later moved to Hollywood in the 1930s and made her film debut in the 1940 film "Escape," directed by Mervyn LeRoy. She appeared in more than 50 films during her career, including "The Picture of Dorian Gray" (1945), "The Man with the Golden Arm" (1955), and "Diamond Head" (1963).

Lovsky was also known for her appearances on television, appearing on popular shows such as "Bonanza," "The Twilight Zone," and "Mission: Impossible." She was nominated for an Emmy Award for her performance in the 1972 TV movie "The Judge and Jake Wyler."

In addition to her acting career, Lovsky was a founding member of the Actors Studio in New York City and worked as an acting coach for many years. She passed away in Los Angeles in 1979 at the age of 82.

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Hope Summers

Hope Summers (June 7, 1896 Mattoon-June 22, 1979 Woodland Hills) also known as Sarah Hope Summers or Hope Sommers was an American actor and character actor.

She began her career in the 1930s and appeared in over 300 film and television roles throughout her career. Some of her most notable roles include Clara Edwards on "The Andy Griffith Show" and "Mayberry R.F.D.", as well as Hattie Denton on "The NBC Mystery Movie" series. She also had roles in films such as "Rosemary's Baby" and "The Honeymooners." Summers was known for her warm and friendly persona on screen, which endeared her to audiences. She continued acting well into her 80s, and her final role was in the film "The Great White Hype" (1996), released posthumously.

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Barbara Mullen

Barbara Mullen (June 9, 1914 Boston-March 9, 1979 London) also known as Barbara Eleanor Mullen was an American actor.

She was born to a family of Irish immigrants and grew up in Jamaica Plain, Massachusetts. Mullen studied at the Leland Powers School of Theatre, and began performing in various stage productions in Boston. She eventually moved to New York City, where she gained further experience on stage and on radio.

Mullen later moved to London, where she made her film debut in the 1946 film "Green for Danger." She went on to have a successful film career, appearing in several notable films such as "The Man Who Never Was" (1956) and "The Nun's Story" (1959).

Additionally, Mullen also had a prolific career on television, appearing in a number of popular series such as "The Avengers," "Danger Man," and "The Saint." She was known for her versatility and ability to adapt to a range of roles, from drama to comedy.

Throughout her career, Mullen remained active in the theatre, both on stage and on radio. She was also involved in charity work, volunteering with organizations such as the National Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Children. Mullen passed away in London at the age of 64, leaving behind a legacy as a talented and versatile actor.

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Allene Ray

Allene Ray (January 2, 1901 San Antonio-May 5, 1979 Temple City) also known as Allene Burch or Allie Ray was an American actor.

Allene Ray began her career in silent films during the 1910s and continued acting in films until the 1940s. She was best known for her roles in adventure and Western films, often playing the lead female character. She starred in popular films such as "The Shadow of the Eagle" (1932) and "The Adventures of Tarzan" (1921). Ray also appeared in several early sound films and worked as a stuntwoman. In addition to her acting career, she was also a successful businesswoman and owned her own beauty shop and bookstore. Ray retired from films in 1941 and remained out of the public eye until her death in 1979.

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Corinne Griffith

Corinne Griffith (November 21, 1894 Texarkana-July 13, 1979 Santa Monica) also known as Corinne Mae Griffin, Orchid Lady or Corinne Mae Griffith was an American actor, film producer, author, dancer and real estate entrepreneur.

She first started her career in films in the silent era and quickly rose to fame due to her unique combination of beauty, talent, and charm. Some of her most notable films include "The Garden of Eden" (1928), "The Divine Lady" (1929), and "Saturday's Children" (1929).

She was also an early pioneer in producing films, starting her own production company, Corinne Griffith Productions, in 1927. As a writer, she penned several articles for various publications and even authored a book titled "Papa's Delicate Condition" which was later adapted into a successful film in 1963.

In addition to her career in entertainment, Griffith was a savvy entrepreneur and invested wisely in real estate. She purchased several properties in California which proved to be lucrative investments, and she also owned a successful cosmetics line.

Despite her successes, Griffith had a difficult personal life, including multiple marriages and legal battles. She passed away in 1979 at the age of 84, leaving behind a legacy as both a Hollywood icon and a savvy businesswoman.

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Louise Allbritton

Louise Allbritton (July 3, 1920 Oklahoma City-February 16, 1979 Mexico) also known as Louise Albritton was an American actor.

She began her career as a stage actress and later transitioned to film and television. She is best known for her roles in films such as "The Egg and I" (1947) and "The Furies" (1950). In addition to her work in Hollywood, Allbritton also had a successful career on Broadway, appearing in productions such as "Very Warm for May" and "Hold On to Your Hats". She retired from acting in the 1950s and lived in Mexico until her death in 1979.

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Rosemary LaPlanche

Rosemary LaPlanche (October 11, 1923 Los Angeles-May 6, 1979 Glendale) also known as Rosemary E. LaPlanche or Rosemary La Planche was an American actor. She had two children, Carol Koplan and Terry Koplan.

LaPlanche was crowned Miss America in 1941, becoming the first Miss California to win the title. She later pursued a career in acting, with roles in films such as "Let's Dance" and "Tarzan and the Huntress." She was also a regular on the television show "The Adventures of Ellery Queen." In addition to her acting career, LaPlanche was an accomplished painter and sculptor. She passed away at the age of 55 from cancer.

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Gladys McConnell

Gladys McConnell (October 22, 1905 Oklahoma City-March 4, 1979 Fullerton) was an American actor. She had one child, Mary Barbara Button.

Gladys McConnell began her acting career in the silent film era and made nearly 90 film and television appearances throughout her career. She was often cast in supporting roles and made several appearances in popular films such as "The Birds" (1963) and "The Graduate" (1967). McConnell also had a successful career in radio and appeared in popular radio programs such as "Lux Radio Theatre" and "The Adventures of Frank Merriwell." In her personal life, McConnell was married to actor John Larkin from 1933 until his death in 1965.

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Peggy Guggenheim

Peggy Guggenheim (August 26, 1898 New York City-December 23, 1979 Padua) also known as Marguerite Guggenheim was an American art collector and actor.

She was a member of the wealthy Guggenheim family, known for their philanthropic efforts in the arts. Peggy became an important figure in promoting and collecting modern art, particularly Surrealism. Her gallery, Art of This Century, in New York City showcased some of the most prominent artists of her time, such as Jackson Pollock and Marcel Duchamp. Peggy herself also collected art, amassing an impressive collection that she later donated to the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation, which was founded by her uncle. Peggy also had a prominent personal life, with several marriages to prominent figures in the art world, including artist Max Ernst. In her later years, she moved to Venice, Italy and lived on the Grand Canal, where she continued to collect and support the arts until her death in 1979.

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Emmaline Henry

Emmaline Henry (November 1, 1928 Philadelphia-October 8, 1979 Palm Springs) was an American actor.

Emmaline Henry was best known for her role as Amanda Bellows on the hit television series "I Dream of Jeannie". She began her career in show business as a singer in the late 1940s and transitioned to television acting in the 1950s. In addition to her memorable role on "I Dream of Jeannie", Henry also made appearances on popular shows such as "The Red Skelton Show", "The Andy Griffith Show", and "Gomer Pyle, U.S.M.C.". She continued acting until her untimely death in 1979 at the age of 50. In addition to her on-screen career, Henry was also a vocal advocate for animal rights and was a supporter of the Humane Society of the United States.

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Hazel Keener

Hazel Keener (October 22, 1904 Fairbury-August 7, 1979 Pacific Grove) also known as Hazel O. Keener was an American actor.

Born in Fairbury, Nebraska, Keener began her acting career in the late 1920s, appearing in several silent films. She was known for her dramatic roles in films such as "The Scarlet Letter" (1934) and "The Story of Louis Pasteur" (1936).

Keener's career continued to flourish in the 1940s and 1950s, in films such as "The Song of Bernadette" (1943), "The Lost Weekend" (1945), and "The Snake Pit" (1948). She also worked in television, including appearances on "The Twilight Zone" and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents."

Keener was married to actor and director Fred J. Butler, and the couple had one child together. In her later years, she retired to Pacific Grove, California where she passed away in 1979 at the age of 74.

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Joan Chandler

Joan Chandler (August 24, 1923 Butler-May 11, 1979 New York City) also known as Joan Cheeseman was an American actor.

She began her career in Hollywood in the late 1940s, appearing in films such as "Humoresque" (1946) and "The Big Sleep" (1946) alongside Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall. Chandler then transitioned to television in the 1950s, guest starring on shows such as "Perry Mason" and "Alfred Hitchcock Presents". She also had a recurring role on the series "Mr. Lucky". Chandler's last acting credit was in the 1973 film "The Way We Were". She passed away from lung cancer in 1979 at the age of 55.

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Doris Packer

Doris Packer (May 30, 1904 Menominee-March 31, 1979 Glendale) also known as Doris Edwards was an American actor.

She appeared in over 50 films and television shows throughout her career. Packer started her acting career in the 1930s and quickly gained recognition for her work in various TV shows and films of the time. She played supporting roles in popular television series such as "I Love Lucy", "Gunsmoke", and "The Twilight Zone". However, she is perhaps best known for her role as "Mrs. Cornelia Rayburn" in the TV series "Family Affair". Packer was also a well-known stage actor, having performed in many Broadway productions throughout her career. She was married to the actor and director Richard Gaines and they had one son together.

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Hilo Hattie

Hilo Hattie (October 28, 1901 Honolulu-December 12, 1979 Honolulu) a.k.a. Clarissa Haili, Claire Haili, Clara Nelson, Auntie Clara Nelson, Clarissa "Clara" Haili, Mrs. Carlyle Nelson, Clara or Hattie, Hilo was an American musician, singer, actor, dancer, comedian and teacher.

She was known as the "First Lady of Hawaiian Music" and was an important figure in spreading Hawaiian culture and music throughout the United States. Hattie began her career in the 1920s, performing in vaudeville shows and on radio. She also appeared in several Hollywood films, including "Song of the Islands" and "Pagan Love Song." Hattie opened her first store in 1963, selling Hawaiian clothing and souvenirs. The store became a popular tourist destination and expanded to several locations throughout Hawaii. Hattie was also an advocate for the rights of Native Hawaiians and helped establish the Queen Liliuokalani Children's Center, which provides support and resources for at-risk youth. She was inducted into the Hawai'i Academy of Recording Arts Hall of Fame in 1972.

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